A Car going at some speed hydroplanes: does it speed up, stay the same, or slow down?

  • Thread starter Quarterbore
  • Start date

What would the Speed of a car do when the car Hydroplanes?

  • Speed Up

    Votes: 2 12.5%
  • Stay the Same

    Votes: 4 25.0%
  • Slow Down

    Votes: 10 62.5%

  • Total voters
    16
  • #26
In the course of my driving history, I have hit many a "puddle of water" some huge, and it can very successfully slow a car down, quite a lot. Water is heavy, and resistant to the passage of a car tire through it, along with the "trailing in/outof the backwash" which can cause differentiation of tractions between the front, and rear tires, hence slippage of the rear can result in the rear accelerating past the front, like a jackknife move just in one piece, around the CoG of the car.

If hitting water doesn't move it for you, try wet slushy snow at high speed, you've no idea the resistance that can offer. (or do you?)

I've also taken a 74(?) Volvo 144 D off of the ground, (tested and proven by a slight tapping of the brakes, in flight, and the squeal of the rubber as it contacts the roadsurface at full stop, in full flight) something that it seemed to handle very well, no "bottoming out" at all, and with two people in the car.....really good heating systems in those cars, too!
 
  • #27
BTW taking a car off of the ground is NOT a good thing to be doing, inasmuch as, generally speaking, unless you have a fenced off property, and the rights to be doing it it simply is NOT safe to be trying anywheres else.

Something I sorta needed to learn, in my life, was to "Always expect, the un-expected, when you least expect it!"

Thinking that "some little country road" (that only you know of) is 'actually safe' to try this on, is a self deception, (fooling yourself) cause that is when that one car, you didn't expect, is going to show up, not worth the risk.
 
  • #28
1
0


Does the speed of a car change when it hydroplanes, of course it does. Friction causes drag even when a car hydroplane otherwise the car will continue ad infinitum. The drag comes from the air against the body of the car, it also comes from the friction between the tyres and the water, all things being equal. Hydroplaning doesn't mean there is no friction, friction forces are still at work and what is lost is traction, ie. the contact between the tyres and the road surface.

When the speed of the car reduces due to friction and it drops below hydroplaning speed, traction is gained back. All things being equal again, with traction available, the speed of the car should go back to its original speed before hydroplaning occured.

I will leave it at that before someone throws in autocruise and anti-lock brake (anti-skid) systems into the equation.
 
  • #29
russ_watters
Mentor
19,861
6,286


This thread ran its course almost 6 years ago....

You may have set a new necropost record!
 

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