A career in gaming (1 Viewer)

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Hi, im am currently doing electronic engineering in college and i was woundering if it was possible to get a career in game design or game development as a electronic engineer, i know that software/digital media engineering is probable a better route to go down in terms of gaming, but programming is now becoming a big part of electronic engineering now adays.

i am still in first year but i know people in second year electronic and they have object orientated projramming, plus i will be learning C in the next semester. plus since i am still in first year i can always change course next year if needs be. but i do have a prefferance to electronics, but any help provided would be much apreciated, thank you.
 

fss

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Maybe in the hardware, but in my experience licensed EEs don't have the programming skills necessary to work competently on large software projects.
 
Why not do graphics cards, sounds cards, innovative controllers?. I would think that it is EE who do all the interface hardware.
 
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In general, gaming programers/designers are treated like garbage. You're a low paid, easily replaceable tool, and you're treated like it.

Now, there are exceptions. I wouldn't leave an EE career in hopes of being one of them.

Best of luck if you still decide to pursue it.
 

Redbelly98

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irwind2, a friend of mine just started a master's program in Game Design and Development, at Rochester Institute of Technology. You might be able to find their website, or call or email them, and inquire about what sort of background is sufficient.
 
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here is a page you might be interested in. RIT is a well known school with fantastic programs. here is their page for a degree in http://www.rit.edu/programs/program_detail.php?id=658" [Broken]. it is a growing field with strict competition. best of luck
 
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It's a pretty hellish job to be a programmer in a game company. The trouble is that with a computer project that is behind schedule, you can normally do two things, you can reduce functionality or you can move the schedule. The trouble with games is that you can sell a game with 90% features and you have to get the game out by Christmas, so what happens is that the managers just crack the whip, and you end up with what in the business is called a "Bantaan death march".
 
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I've been trying to get into the game development industry for some time (since 2008). I've met with those already in the industry that gave me some great insight before joining. Some really hate it and want to go back to the corporate world, some love it. But before you decide to go for it, consider that this is what you want to do, especially if you are going for a degree concentrated in game programming.

For game design: Creativity cannot be taught, you are either creative or not. IMO, degrees in game design are a waste of time and money. Most people in the industry would take it as a joke based on their opinions. I only know 3 designers in the industry and all 3 of them do not have a degree. They were former modders and custom level designers.

For game programming: You need to do a whole hell more than just academics. Programming needs to be a top priority in life, just like how IT security professionals are with networking and hacking. You need personal and outside projects (check out gamedev.net's forums for hobbyist game projects) for a portfolio.

And like what two-fish said, a programmer in a game company is far, far worse than one in Defense (like me) or in any software development company. You are treated with no respect and get half the pay. Overtime is common and don't expect having much of a social life or time with the family outside of work.

My credentials (MS in Comp Eng + 2 years in the industry) is what qualifies me as an "entry-level programmer" in the game industry, at least based the job postings I've seen in the past few years. You need to think hard before focusing a career in this industry. It does not fit for most people out there.
 
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For a taste of how awesome it is being a developer, you might try:

http://brokentoys.org/2010/10/28/eaology/ [Broken]

I'm not suggesting this is some kind of sampling. I'm just saying its a good source for some opinions on what it's like to be a gaming developer from a few people who appear to be in the business.

JodiMae said:
Since when are we shocked that EA (or really the Games Industry in general) doesn’t value developer Quality of Life?

I mean, seriously… When?

I’ve been in EA, fired from EA, hired by EA again and fired again. Its not a surprise when you “get the call”. It comes when you are still too tired from “gotta ship NOW” crunch time. We even joke about how much time we would have on our hands next month when we got canned. How many grid pools are there in the final weeks of projects on how many people and how many days it would take to announce?

We shouldn’t be shocked…

The business can only get away with it because there are never-ending waves of naive graduates of the game development diploma mills out there.

Idiot Loser #1: I can’t believe we get PAID for this.
Idiot Loser #2: Yeah, my Mom said I wouldn’t get anywhere by playing games!

Shut these down and maybe EA/Others would think that maybe, just maybe screwing with the labor force might be a bad idea…

Nah… they wont ever get that message.
My emphasis.
 
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thanks for the advice everyone it was really helpful,
 
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Overtime is common and don't expect having much of a social life or time with the family outside of work.
One small correction here, I believe that fizziks meant "unpaid overtime". And if he didn't, he should have. :smile:
 
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One small correction here, I believe that fizziks meant "unpaid overtime". And if he didn't, he should have. :smile:
Correct me if I'm wrong but doesn't Cali offer some type of paid overtime now? Since most game development companies are in Cali, I think this would apply to them working more than 40 hours

My company offers payment in the form of vacation hours. Time after 45 hours per week are rewarded to us as vacation hours.
 
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Correct me if I'm wrong but doesn't Cali offer some type of paid overtime now? Since most game development companies are in Cali, I think this would apply to them working more than 40 hours.
Just because there's a law requiring it, doesn't mean you actually get it, as well :wink:
 
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Correct me if I'm wrong but doesn't Cali offer some type of paid overtime now? Since most game development companies are in Cali, I think this would apply to them working more than 40 hours

My company offers payment in the form of vacation hours. Time after 45 hours per week are rewarded to us as vacation hours.
Interestingly enough, http://www.dir.ca.gov/dlse/faq_overtime.htm indicates that indeed, salaried employees are entitled to overtime. However, there is a class of "exempt" employees who are not... and honestly, every computer industry job I've ever had that was salaried was classified as exempt. I had assumed that all salaried employees were exempt, but this is apparently not the case.

Anyway, unpaid overtime seems to be the norm, not the exception.
 

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