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A crisp new word

  1. Jul 29, 2004 #1
    The space entity whose quantity is "Length" is the "Line"
    The space entity whose quantity is "Area" is the "Surface"
    The space entity whose quantity is "Volume" is the "???"
    The term "solid" is not satisfactory, as the entity may be (the space occupied by) a body of liquid or gas.
    Anyone knows the correct term?
    I have been using the term "TRISP", short for "TRI - SPACE ", with my students for many years
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 29, 2004 #2
    volume volume volume volume volume volume volume
    volume volume volume
     
  4. Jul 30, 2004 #3

    marcus

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    you might try "room"

    a cubical room, a conical room
    a cylindrical room
    occupied by whatever you want (solid, liquid, gas)
    the measure of the room's size is volume
     
  5. Jul 30, 2004 #4

    Galileo

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    It's space.
    You're talking about the volume of a certain space as you''re talking about the the area of a certain surface.
     
  6. Jul 30, 2004 #5
    crisp new word

    Volume is the quantity. Do we give the same name to the entity?

    Space includes surfaces and lines. To be rigorous, we have to say "Three Dimensinal Surface". This long word is shortened first as Tri Space; and further as"Trisp"
     
  7. Jul 30, 2004 #6
    crisp new word

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Volume is the quantity. Do we give the same name to the entity?

    What do we do when we want to denote a room (full of objects and air)?

    Space includes surfaces and lines. To be rigorous, we have to say "Three Dimensinal Space". This long word is shortened first as Tri Space; and further as"Trisp"
     
  8. Jul 30, 2004 #7

    marcus

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    Mani, this is in the realm of linguistic invention. We are talking matters of taste.
    You have taken to saying "Trisp" with your students. That sounds to me like an unattractive choice and I would not have wanted to use it when I was teaching. But DE GUSTIBUS NON DISPUTANDUM EST and if it works for you and they like it, then fine!

    If I was teaching middle or highschool students and they insisted on having a special word for a 3D region of space I would let them make up one and I personally would suggest saying threebus


    Although I do not like your particular verbal invention, I think several of us understand the problem.

    Going back to conventional language of, say, 1900

    A Line had Length
    A Surface had Area
    A Space had Volume

    (Also a "Solid Figure" was a conventional synonym for a 3D shape with volume. Sometimes the term "Body" was used for a 3D thing. Neither seems quite right though.)

    THEN in the 20th century mathematicians started using "Space" very generally----a space of solutions, a space of functions, a topological space---and they began doing geometry in N-dimensions.

    So "Space" lost its firm 3D connotation.

    ------misc. alternatives---------
    threebus
    container
    room
    pod
    cubby
    raum
    box
    package
    block
    holder
    case
    platz
    bod
    threebod
     
  9. Jul 30, 2004 #8

    jcsd

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    You have line intergrals, you have surface intergrals and you have volume intergrals.
     
  10. Jul 30, 2004 #9

    marcus

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    that's right, in math-talk the word "volume" has the dual function of being the 3D analog of area

    and also the 3D analog of surface

    you can talk about a conical surface and ask about
    "the area of that surface"

    but if you have a spherical volume you have to ask about
    "the volume of that volume"

    We know how mathematicians talk and that they use "volume" to mean both the geometrical entity, the 3D region, AND the measure of it.

    How mathematicians talk is not the issue.

    this guy feels linguistically inventive and he doesnt like
    how "what is the volume of that volume" sounds

    he wants an nice-sounding 3D analog for
    "what is the area of that surface?"

    I am recommending to him that he and his students should say threebus


    "there is a certain threebus bounded by a certain paraboloid of revolution
    what is the volume of this threebus?"

    If you are purely a mathematician you wont enjoy the discussion, you have to be part writer, or have an interest in English style, or want to invent words like he is doing.
     
  11. Jul 31, 2004 #10
     
  12. Jul 31, 2004 #11

    jcsd

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    Trisp is not cromulent.
     
  13. Jul 31, 2004 #12

    Janitor

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    Aerospace engineers speak of 'ullage.' It means the unused volume in a tank of liquid, but maybe that term would do in a pinch. :wink:
     
  14. Jul 31, 2004 #13

    marcus

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    If you are still teaching that age-group of students, and the students helped come up with the word as you say, that seems like a good reason to stick with trisp. It's nice to have some grassroots participation in deciding on language.

    No serious reason to consider "threebus" I just like the sound. It strikes me as remarkably cromulent.

    And it extends nicely to make a name for 4D chunks of spacetime:

    a 4-simplex (the 4D analog of a tetrahedron) is a kind of "fourbus"


    Indeed a square patch of surface or 2D disk or other 2D figure is a twobus

    except we already call it a patch of surface.

    ----------
    You asked (seriously or not) about the "bus" part of the word. All I can think of are echos of omnibus, rhombus, rebus, dingus (a word for thingamabob)
    but maybe better justifications occur to you.
     
  15. Jul 31, 2004 #14

    Gokul43201

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    I agree with jcsd and marcus. 'Volume integral' it is, is it not ?
     
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