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A delta problem

  1. Feb 1, 2007 #1
    | √4x-1 -3 | < .5 X-2<delta

    use graph to find delta, u can draw out the graph which is simple, the 4x-1 is squared, it's just i couldn't fit the square root on it all,

    now, the coordinates are 2,3 and 3 goes to 3.5 and 2.5

    now here's where i get stuck, what do i do with the absolute value of square root 4x-1, because i plug in 3.5 and 2.5 and subtract those with 2 and there not even close to the answer which is 1.44
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 2, 2007 #2

    HallsofIvy

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    You could at least use parentheses! √(4x-1) or just sqrt(4x-1). Is there a reason for use both x and X? Do they represent different values? And for God's sake don't confuse things by saying "squared" when you mean square root!

    This make no sense at all. The coordinates of WHAT are "2,3" (and do you mean (2, 3) so that an x coordinate is 2 and a y coordinate 3)? I can make no sense at all out of "3 goes to 3.5 and 2.5". 3 is a specific number- it can't "go" to anything else.

    Do you mean putting 3.5 and 2.5 equal to X in .5X- 2?

    To begin with, if you actually graph y= √(4x-1)-3 and y= .5x- 2, you will see that √(4x-1)-3< .5x- 2 is not true for x around 2, 3, 2.5, or 3.5. Please state the problem exactly as it is given.
     
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