A follow up of the question about gears of the winder

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In summary: This in turn reduces the amount of friction and drag created by the two objects rotating around each other.
  • #1
stephen
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Hi all!
I open a new thread since I am going to post another picture, and this would overload the old thread.

The first picture shows the number of teeth of the meshing gears.
I was wrong that the pair of worm gears are glued. They are not glued as mentioned by Q_Goest. And the two gears are rotating at different rates.

The second picture shows the label of the counter.

What I am going to ask is the meaning of the label.

From the number of teeth of the gears indicated in the first picture, it is known that the 102 worm gear rotate at a lower speed than the 100 one.
I find that for every 30 turns of gear A would finally cause Gear C(102teeth) to lag behind GearC(100teeth) by 1/51 turns.

So in the label, it can be visualised that when the 30 turns are rotated, the outer point would just finished rotating one complete circle. And the inner pointer would move one little grid. (Some error in the picture drawn, the inner circle should be divided into 51 divisons, instead of 50 divisions. I find this in the real label provided.)

First of all, is my intepretation correct?

If yes, I have got some questions.

Why do the calibration of the inner circle so strange? Why don't it just writes "10, 20, 30, 40, 51" but "1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 5100" instead?


Second, if I am the user of the this winder, and I am going to count how many revolution of have I rotated the handle. If I am to do so, I need to multipy the readings of 30, right? Don't you think this is strange? Have I interpreted the usage wrongly?

And it seems to me that the outer circle is of no practical use...It only returns to zero for every 30 times of rotation of the handle.

Sorry for such a long thread...I am really such an idiot. Hope to receive your nice help~
 

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  • #2
oops..
I just knew that I could post pictures in the 'reply'..
sorry for starting another thread...
Please relocate this thread if any inconvenience is caused.
 
  • #3
I discovered that I asked a silly question.
The winder is not going to record how many turns the handle retotate but the 30 teeth gear...So the label should really be marked "1000, 2000, 3000, 4000.etc"
I think I now understand the entire mechanism.

But I still don't quite understand the orientation of the pair of worm gears. i.e. the "turbine" shape...
Q_Geost, do you mean the pair of grears' orientation is such that the drive gear would have a greater contact area with the pair of worm gear? And this reduce the pressure?
 
  • #4
Each time gear B rotates, the worm gear rotates once and the two gears it is rotating (the 100 tooth and 102 tooth worm wheels) only rotate by 1 tooth. Also, gear B will rotate 100/30 or 3.333 times for each time you rotate the handle. This assumes there is only an idler gear between the two which isn't certain given the picture.

Regarding the "turbine" look of those two gears, I'm assuming you're referring to the slighty slanted angle on the teeth. There's a couple of pictures of typical worm gear and worm wheel assemblies here:
http://www.qtcgears.com/e-store/Images/Worm.jpg
http://www.tasonic.com.tw/images/PAGE6/6-2.JPG
In each case you can see the teeth on the worm wheel are slightly angled so they mesh with the worm gear (screw shaped gear). Is that what you were referring to? If so, the reason for the slight angle on the teeth should be fairly obvious. It allows the worm gear and worm wheels to contact over a larger area.
 
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Related to A follow up of the question about gears of the winder

1. What is the purpose of gears of the winder?

The gears of the winder are used to transfer energy from a power source to the mechanism that winds or unwinds a spool or reel. This can be seen in various devices such as watches, clocks, and even fishing reels.

2. How do gears of the winder work?

Gears of the winder work by meshing together with each other, with one gear being the driving gear and the other being the driven gear. As the driving gear rotates, it transfers its energy to the driven gear, causing it to rotate as well. This rotation can then be used to wind or unwind the spool or reel.

3. What are the different types of gears used in a winder?

There are several types of gears that can be used in a winder, including spur gears, bevel gears, worm gears, and planetary gears. The type of gear used will depend on the specific application and the required speed, torque, and precision.

4. What are the challenges in designing gears of the winder?

Designing gears of the winder can be challenging due to factors such as the required gear ratio, the amount of torque needed, and the space limitations. It is important to carefully consider these factors and use precise calculations and measurements to ensure the gears are properly designed and will function effectively.

5. How can gears of the winder be maintained?

To maintain the functionality of gears of the winder, regular lubrication and cleaning are essential. This helps to reduce friction and wear on the gears, ensuring they continue to function properly. It is also important to regularly check for any signs of damage or wear and replace any worn or damaged gears as needed.

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