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A Force Unit

  1. Sep 15, 2004 #1
    Can anyone give me description of a mechanical way you would make a standard unit of force if you were Newton and on the road to creating a unit because you understood the principles behind the force unit?

    I have one. When two masses are on the plates of a scale and the scale reads equal, I have two equal masses. If I change out one mass with a third piece of mass by putting it in one of the plates and the scale is still equal, I have three equal masses. When I put the mass that was taken off by putting it on the plate with the third mass, the scale is uneven. This displacement of unevenness could be used as a linear representation of the basis unit of force (gravitational force on a specific mass) for any one of my equal masses.

    Other masses weighed using the same method would have shorter or longer linear representations of force. Using a standard of distance, each length representing force would be able to be used with speed and velocity (because they would use the same standard distance unit) making it possible to use my basic unit in momentum, work, energy equations.

    My unit would be based upon mass acting opon mass, through the help of gravity, and represented as a basic unit of displacement, but called force.

    (Although, the curvature created by the scale of different lengths would have to be taken into account.)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 16, 2004 #2

    Chi Meson

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    If it works for you, Jolly good! I think that this would require, however, a "standardized scale" that would have to be made for each and every laboratory, as well as a standardize mass (such as the kilogram already is). So it seems that this would be a less convenient unit for research.

    Now in addition, you would need to re-derive all of the standard mechanics equations. I don't see how this definition of force would work for prediciting acceleration or torque, but that's for you to work out.
     
  4. Sep 17, 2004 #3
    Thanks for the response, but how would you describe the force unit for use if you were in Newtons situation? I'm interested in peoples descriptions.
     
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