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A good EM book that isn't too detailed

  1. Mar 6, 2005 #1
    I've been studying a course in EM covering the basic E, B fields, Maxwell's laws, EM waves, Induction etc in my first year undergrad Physics course. It isn't a topic I feel particularly comfortable with and am planning on spending quite a bit of my easter holidays reviewing (or more likely learning!) the entire course. The notes from my lecture course are not particularly good, as the lecturer did not use vector notation nor define directions on his diagrams and rather more 'guessed' the required form. I was thus wondering if anyone could recommend:

    1. A good EM book that isn't too detailed (ie. someone who really isn't confident on the subject!!!) but still covers the use of vector notation, that I can use to teach myself the entire topic. I already have Feynman (who I know covers EM thoroughly, although I find him a little waffley) and our lecturer recommended Duffin and Grant & Phillips. Any other suggestions?

    2. A good set of lecture notes from another University that are available online?

    Thanks :smile:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 6, 2005 #2

    SpaceTiger

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    I don't know if this fits your requirement, but I've always preferred Griffiths.
     
  4. Mar 6, 2005 #3

    Claude Bile

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    I agree, I found Griffiths was useful because the mathematics that is required is also covered in the textbook (1st chapter, actually). The theorems presented are done with a good balance between rigid mathematics and literary explanation, and all steps are carefully explained and justified (very few hand waving arguments). He also presents lots of neat little ways to solve common types of problems.

    Griffiths covers Electrostatics, Magnetostatics, Maxwell's Equations in media, Electrodynamics and electromagnetic waves. He also does a nice chapter on Electromagnetism and relativity.

    Claude.
     
  5. Mar 7, 2005 #4
    Thanks for the recommendation. One question, is it more related to a Physics degree in America than England?
     
  6. Mar 7, 2005 #5

    SpaceTiger

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    I found it the best for learning the material and I suppose it helped a bit with the Physics GREs, but I don't know what the differences in curricula are for the US and Britain.
     
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