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B A good quality telescope?

  1. Mar 28, 2017 #1
    I purchased a 6" mirror reflector telescope, but no matter how much I tried to get good photos all came out blurry, I'm guessing the mirror was low quality, also the tracking system made absolutely no sense and could not even find the Moon. Not just that but it wasn't stable either.

    So basically I'd like any recommendations for a really good quality telescope with tracking that can at least take great pictures of the planets.

    I'm willing to spend up to $1,500.

    Thanks in advance!
     
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  3. Mar 28, 2017 #2

    davenn

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    what make and model of scope ?
    what sort of camera were you trying to use ?
    how were you mounting the camera to the scope ?

    sounds more like user error than a faulty/poor scope


    the scope mount is almost more important than the scope .... great optics on a crappy mount wont solve any problems

    so again what make and model have you got
    a photo ? ... a link to it's sales
    what country are you in ?
    is that US$1500 or some other currency ?


    Dave
     
  4. Mar 28, 2017 #3

    russ_watters

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    ...and don't let that sound like an insult to you; astrophotography is a set of skills with difficult learning curves.

    Adding to the potential issues though might be an expectations gap.
     
  5. Mar 28, 2017 #4

    davenn

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    maybe I could have worded that better .... definitely not intended as an insult
    Astrophotography is not a trivial activity :smile:


    Dave
     
  6. Mar 28, 2017 #5
    This is an image I took with the reflector. With or without the camera it looked the same. Almost like a double image.
     

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  7. Mar 28, 2017 #6
    yes US currency, and I'm in the US
     
  8. Mar 28, 2017 #7

    russ_watters

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    That is a decent starter scope and your first image isn't bad. A couple of tips right away;
    1. Ensure the mount mode (alt/AZ or eq) is correct and you set it up properly. Getting the mount set up isn't always easy and it is easy to make mistakes.
    2. It looks like the moon might have been low in the sky. That hurts image quality a lot.
    3. Focus on a star with your eyes. If it isn't a pinpoint or maybe with concentric rings, you may need to collimate the scope. Common for a new scope.

    What kind of camera did you use and how did you attach it?
     
  9. Mar 28, 2017 #8
    I used the camera that came with the scope, I believe it was a few megapixels.
    Also here is an image I took with my 3in refractor, which came out way better for some reason with the same camera attached.
     

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  10. Mar 28, 2017 #9

    russ_watters

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    I didn't think you did, but some people take it that way. :smile:
     
  11. Mar 28, 2017 #10

    davenn

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    OK, not a bad effort for an early attempt

    that doesn't really tell us much ....
    show a photo of it
    how does it connect to the scope ?
     
  12. Mar 28, 2017 #11

    russ_watters

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    I don't see it described in your link; what is the make and model? And megapixels are meaningless.
     
  13. Mar 28, 2017 #12
    what make and model of scope ?
    I believe it's twin star, here is an exact link

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/New-6-Compu...58256a5&pid=100009&rk=1&rkt=2&sd=141237956239

    what sort of camera were you trying to use ?

    The 3MP camera that came with the scope, it attaches to the eyepiece and connects to the computer via USB. Not sure what brand though.


    how were you mounting the camera to the scope ?

    I was mounting it to the eye piece by putting it on and the tightening that little screw on the side.
     
  14. Mar 28, 2017 #13

    russ_watters

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    We'll need to know the make and model when you can look at it - should be written on the camera.
    Sorry, but that doesn't make much sense. Do you mean instead of the eyepiece, on the eyepiece mount?
     
  15. Mar 29, 2017 #14
    Can we forget about the camera, does it look like that with an eyepiece in? If not, it's not the mirror.

    Where is the moon when you are taking the picture? I get a similar distortion effect when I take pictures of the sky in the direction of NYC (I live < 10 miles away.) Pollution, light pollution, and heat from the buildings all make skygazing harder. That picture of the moon looks a lot like some that I've taken. It's not my scope, it's my location. When I take my scope to my mom's in the country, it's way better.

    Also, how long is the exposure? It's actually better to take many short exposures and stack them. The atmosphere distorts images more than most people realize. Looking at the moon through a telescope makes it look like it's underwater and the lower on the sky it is, the worse it gets.

    How good is the tracking on your mount? Is it jittery or smooth? If the gears have a tooth that's catching on something, the tracking will be jittery the image will bounce around.

    Can you reduce the amount of light coming in? The moon is actually pretty bright, you do not need or want 6 inches. My scope has a hard cover like this:
    post-244209-0-34936600-1438192499.jpg
    When I shoot the moon, I actually leave the cover on and only remove the smaller part of it.
     
  16. Mar 29, 2017 #15
    I highly doubt its the camera since it looks exactly the same through the eyepiece, so not sure why the camera type would be relevant. If you look at ordinary objects with the telescope such as grass it still looks the same, almost like a double image.
     
  17. Mar 29, 2017 #16
    Can you post a picture of it aimed at something terrestrial? Preferably something with regular lines that we could key in on: a stop sign?
     
  18. Mar 29, 2017 #17
    Sure will post an image
     
  19. Mar 29, 2017 #18

    PAllen

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    To my naive eye, both those moon images look out of focus, at least if that is also how they look through the eyepiece. I only have 3.5 inch reflector, and never attempt photos, but the moon always looks spectacular and sharp, way better than either of those images. It's the one object always easy; everything else is hit or miss for me since I only go out once year or so (well, Saturn is always nice, but stripes on Jupiter - hardly ever).
     
  20. Mar 30, 2017 #19

    sophiecentaur

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    May I add my two cents worth, as a real beginner in this? Earlier posts are suggesting that motion blur could be a problem. The Moon is a large object in 'full sunlight' so the standard exposure at moderate ISO numbers is the familiar 125th at f8. I haven't ever seen motion blur on any of the pictures I have taken of the Moon on an 8" Dobs with either of my DSLRs - unlike the star trails with 10s exposures, taken directly with camera and telephoto lens. I don't know what ISO an astro camera uses (?).
    Focus appears not good on those images. Buy a bahtimov mask and get razor sharp focus (tape the focus wheel, once you have focussed a nearby star, this way)
    Taking photos in the dark, with unfamiliar equipment etc etc, is a nightmare. There is so much to think about and when I look at 99% of my astro images, they suck.
    This isn't clear. Normally, a specialised camera is used in 'Prime Focus', without using an eyepiece at all (except when a smart phone is clipped onto the eyepiece, in place of your actual eye). If you are taking images through an eyepiece then it's possible that the camera fixing is wonky. Using 'live view', is that the best focus you can get? As commented above, you should expect 'razor sharp' (that is, until you look at them in the cold light of dawn. lol)
    Get a book on astrophotography is some of this thread is gobbledegook. It will be money well spent, whatever level you are at.
    Don't give up. There is light at the end of the tunnel. (Moonlight.)
     
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