Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

A hole on Mars

  1. Jun 8, 2007 #1
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 8, 2007 #2

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Interesting/odd. Sinkhole....?
     
  4. Jun 8, 2007 #3

    wolram

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    They say,

    Because the spot lacks a raised rim or tossed out material called ejecta, researchers have ruled out the pit being an impact crater. No walls or other details can be seen inside the hole, and so any possible walls might be perfectly vertical and extremely dark or - more likely - overhanging.

    An old lava tube?
     
  5. Jun 8, 2007 #4

    Kurdt

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Thats very interesting. Possibility for underground rivers? Could it not be a meteor impact on a very thin crust or would that produce ejecta aswell?
     
  6. Jun 8, 2007 #5

    berkeman

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Yeah, when I saw that on APOD, I was astounded. Is that the Millenium Falcon down there in the lower right? J/K. It will be very interesting to see what the orbiters can see over the coming months:

     
  7. Jun 8, 2007 #6
    seems that lil martians are planning their attack.
    lava tube? i dont know, i mean there should have been some lava impressions around. seems to be a cleverly dug hole.
    can it be a small meteorite just having enough energy to dig up a hole, not to make a blast and the left over(of the lil blast) was blown away by the wind?

    but still an alien attack is much more interesting
     
  8. Jun 8, 2007 #7

    Integral

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I am sorry, but I reserve the right to be skeptical, that is to black. It looks more like a camera issue then a real feature.
     
  9. Jun 8, 2007 #8

    wolram

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I thought that at first, but then thought they must have ruled it out very
    early on, as you say it does look to black ,and it looks to regular to me.
     
  10. Jun 8, 2007 #9
    yeah i thought that way too, like something on the lens or something
     
  11. Jun 8, 2007 #10

    berkeman

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Come to think of it, isn't this the way "2001 A Space Odessy" started out? :uhh:

    Oh no, wait. That black thing was on the moon. Never mind.
     
  12. Jun 8, 2007 #11

    wolram

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    In April, it was announced that the NASA Mars Odyssey and its Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) found near the equator seven dark spots that scientists think could be entrances to underground caves.

    Seven dark spots.
     
  13. Jun 8, 2007 #12

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Dunno - in that first picture, it seems to me to have a clearly-defined rim with depth.
     
  14. Jun 8, 2007 #13

    baywax

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Here's the close-up shot of the "hole".

    http://www.space.com/php/multimedia...lanet.+Credit:+NASA/JPL/University+of+Arizona

    You can see its rim and you can see dust from the rim being moved across the face of the volcano its on.

    Since it is identified as being on the side of a volcano I'd say it would be perfectly normal for say an ash and pumice based surface that is thin and fragile caving in. And it would be normal for spacious and vacuuous caverns to be just under such a surface.


    Has anyone seen (the mars) rover lately?:bugeye:
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2007
  15. Jun 8, 2007 #14

    wolram

    User Avatar
    Gold Member


    Would there not be visible cracks around the edge?
     
  16. Jun 8, 2007 #15
    Oh come on guys, it's OBVIOUS...

    MARS IS A FAKE!

    This photograph CLEARLY shows that the "planet" Mars is nothing more than a Hollywood prop made of carefully painted paper mache. The hole you see there is undoubtedly where the large rubber balloon, used as a form to hold the paper mache until it dried, was removed after being deflated.

    Taken in the context of many other recently discovered facts the conclusion is unavoidable.

    Everyone knows that the Moon is made of cheese. This was established more than a century ago. Yet there were NO traces, whatsoever, of any cheese at all on the shoes of the astronauts that supposedly "walked on the Moon".

    Then there's the ridiculous idea that the Earth circles the Sun. I mean really. Any of us, can stand perfectly still on any clear day, so that we KNOW that we're not the ones moving, and watch as the Sun moves overhead. Obviously the Sun must be moving around the Earth, not the other way around.

    It's a conspiracy. "Scientists" are simply trying to convince us that their bazaar "theories" should be taken seriously. Well - I, for one, am not fooled!

    (Unfortunately, given the current environment of rampant idiocy loose in our so called "modern age of reason", I suppose that it IS incumbent upon me to actually note for all reading this that - I'M JOKING O.K.? As in "ha ha", and please don't offer this to Sam Brownback as source material to be quoted in his next N.Y. Times Op Ed piece?)
     
  17. Jun 8, 2007 #16

    DaveC426913

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I say we ban him anyway. It's the only way to be sure.
     
  18. Jun 8, 2007 #17

    Ouabache

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Yes amazingly, Oppportunity and Spirit Mars Rovers are both up and running and collecting new data.

    It does sound like something out of Arthur C. Clarke's novel. If we were in GD forum, I would elaborate. :smile:

    I also felt it may be an artifact of the imaging. I would expect as good scientists, they would take photos of the same location on different passes, as well as other locations, to rule out an artifact.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2007
  19. Jun 8, 2007 #18
    That was my first thought as well. Imagine what this would look like from space.

    [​IMG]
     
  20. Jun 8, 2007 #19

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Maybe - what's that at 11 o'clock? Regardless, the surface looks to be characterized by sand dunes, so smaller cracks may be filled-in.
    Wow, great example. That's exactly what it looks like to me. And 330 feet deep! Yikes.
     
  21. Jun 9, 2007 #20

    Ivan Seeking

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Usually called a skylight.
    http://www.decadevolcano.com/photos/keywords/skylight.htm

    A friend commented that already he heard comments about using the "caves on Mars" as a shelter for a human habitat. Somehow the idea of going all the way to Mars just to live as cavepeople seems a little ironic. :biggrin:
     
    Last edited: Jun 9, 2007
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: A hole on Mars
  1. Life on mars? (Replies: 14)

  2. Terraforming Mars (Replies: 80)

  3. Mars in the future (Replies: 2)

  4. Radiation on Mars (Replies: 3)

  5. Survival on Mars? (Replies: 257)

Loading...