A limit maximum temperature ?

In summary, the conversation covers the topics of maximum temperature and the number of universes. The participants discuss the equation that relates kinetic energy, momentum, and rest mass, and how it applies in the case of particles approaching the speed of light. They also mention the concept of infinite universes, and how it relates to the idea of infinite particles in an infinite universe. The relevance of these discussions to nuclear and particle physics is also mentioned.
  • #1

JPC

206
1
Hi

I was wondering if there is a maximum temperature

As i understand temperature : Energy
With cinetic energy creates movement that creates particle shocks, which liberates energy, as i understand it.

And since Ec = 0.5*m*v², and that v <= c, there should be a maximum particle Ec we could reach ?

If my understanding is completely wrong tell me please
And, i am also curious to know , if any reasonable theories have the idea of a maximum temperature
 
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  • #2
sorry, but Ec = 0.5*m*v² only holds for v << c.. the general expression is:

[tex] (E_c+mc^2)^2 = (pc)^2 + (mc^2)^2 [/tex]

Where [tex] p = \gamma m v [/tex]

[tex] \gamma = \frac{1}{1-(v/c)^2} [/tex]

Now as v goes to c, E_c goes to infinity.

The maximum kinetic energy must be bounded by the total energy of the universe for sure.
 
  • #3
Oh, since there is a more general expression, it clarifies everything.
But what is the logic behind the first question u gave me ?

And, is there only one universe ?
i thought there could be an infinite number of universes, forming some sort of particles; which themselves would form other sorts of particles; ect
 
  • #4
This equation comes from special theory of relativity (Einstein 1905)

Total energy squared = momentum squared + rest mass squared

Total energy = kinetic energy + rest mass (I have assumed no potential energy here, i.e a free particle)


And what is the relevance of number of universes? (this is first of all Nuclear- and particle physics subforum. Secondly, it is unrelated to your question and should have a thread for itself)
btw: Infinite number of universes don't make sense.. infinity is a mathematical concept, not an entity.
 
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  • #5
ok now i see the logic of the equation, thank you

Should i make a new thread for the second question ? in what section ?
And, i thought space was infinite, so why not the number of particles too?
 
  • #6
first, you can search for old threads, it is a quite common asked question. If you don't find, try cosmology forum.

(our) universe is not infinite, it is finite but unlimited. Compare with the surface of a sphere in 3dimensions. It has a finite area, but it has no boundaries. I think the number of electrons in the universe is something like 10^87 or something..
 
  • #7
Ok, I am going to check/or/post there
 
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1. What is a limit maximum temperature?

A limit maximum temperature is the highest temperature that a system or substance can reach before it undergoes a change in state or becomes unstable.

2. How is a limit maximum temperature determined?

A limit maximum temperature is determined through experimentation and analysis of the properties of the system or substance. Factors such as pressure, volume, and composition can also affect the limit maximum temperature.

3. Why is it important to know the limit maximum temperature of a substance?

Knowing the limit maximum temperature of a substance is important for safety purposes, as exceeding this temperature can result in hazardous reactions or damage to equipment. It is also crucial for understanding the properties and behavior of the substance.

4. Can the limit maximum temperature of a substance change?

Yes, the limit maximum temperature of a substance can change depending on external factors such as pressure or composition. It can also change over time due to chemical reactions or phase changes.

5. How is a limit maximum temperature different from a melting point or boiling point?

A limit maximum temperature is a general term that refers to the highest temperature that a substance can reach, while a melting point and boiling point are specific temperatures at which a substance changes from a solid to a liquid and from a liquid to a gas, respectively.

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