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A liquid similar water?

  1. Aug 16, 2009 #1
    Is there an other liquid that was similar water(In Convection current) but without the conductivity of it?
     
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  3. Aug 17, 2009 #2

    Integral

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    When did water become conductive?
     
  4. Aug 17, 2009 #3
    Well, because of its natural pH of 7 and consquent ion density, water is a little conductive, right?
     
  5. Aug 17, 2009 #4

    Mentallic

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    Well conductivity is all relative, but most would say water is an insulator. So you're looking for a liquid that is similar but has less conductivity than water? Shall I assume you aren't going to care about the temperature range of what this substance's melting point is?
     
  6. Aug 17, 2009 #5
    Ultra pure water.Because the onset of convection depends on the difference in density and viscosity, there can be no other liquid with similarity in convection current
    This text is from wiki
    The onset of natural convection is determined by the Rayleigh number (Ra). This dimensionless number is given by
    Ra=ΔρgL^3/Dμ

    where

    Δρ is the difference in density between the two parcels of material that are mixing
    g is the local gravitational acceleration
    L is the characteristic length-scale of convection: the depth of the boiling pot, for example
    D is the diffusivity of the characteristic that is causing the convection, and
    μ is the dynamic viscosity
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2009
  7. Aug 17, 2009 #6
    Thanks a lot.
    I see that water is used in radiator because of it's convection. However in an electric environment water can't be used.It's obvious that water conductivity can damage electric device. Because of this i try to find another liquid to use instead of water.
     
  8. Aug 17, 2009 #7

    Vanadium 50

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    The stuff you are looking for is deionized or low-conductivity water.
     
  9. Aug 17, 2009 #8
    How can you deionize water? Won't it always have some ions due to its pH?
     
  10. Aug 17, 2009 #9
    He is talking about deionising water of impurities
     
  11. Aug 17, 2009 #10

    Integral

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    DI water systems are commonplace in wafer fabs. They consist of plastic plumbing with supply and return lines so can be kept continually circulating through the filter system. I have seen DI water circulation used to cool High Voltage plates in MW+ radar systems aboard US Navy Ships. Depending on the care taken the resistance can be up to 18MOhms.
     
  12. Aug 18, 2009 #11
    How your opinion about oil(kerosene or another types that is used for avoiding friction) instead of water?
    I hear alcohol also has some water and therefore can't be used in this case.
     
  13. Aug 19, 2009 #12

    GT1

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    Try to use Isopar.
    http://www.exxonmobilchemical.com/Public_Products/Fluids/Aliphatics/Worldwide/FAQs/Fluids_Aliphatics_FAQ_Isopar.asp [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  14. Aug 20, 2009 #13

    Vanadium 50

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    You need to speak to a professional. We've explained the industry standard solution, which you have apparently rejected. Fine...but if you are going to do that, you should be talking to a professional and not a bunch of people on the internet.
     
  15. Aug 20, 2009 #14
    Thanks bro and excuse me for any disrespect.
    But industry standard is not necessary.
    This is a student level work(Not an industrial laboratory project) and i don't need high level professional knowledge because unfortunately I don't have enough money to buy a similar device only for modeling from it.
    My question is simple, i know ,water can damage board and therefore i try to find a simple replacement liquid that can also transfer heat (not similar water).
    Could u help me?
     
  16. Aug 21, 2009 #15

    Vanadium 50

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    No, I can't help you. I pointed out that deionized water is used for this application, and you pooh-poohed it.

    Whatever.
     
  17. Aug 21, 2009 #16
    If I right understand, deionized water is water without salt.
    But the water nature is pernicious for any electronic board and IC. Also Water will cause corrosion. Are u agree with me?
     
  18. Aug 21, 2009 #17

    Vanadium 50

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    No, Sampro, I don't agree with you. But since you clearly have no intention of reading what I wrote above, I'm done here.
     
  19. Aug 21, 2009 #18
    Our project is not a theoretical project. This kind of material maybe hard to supply. I want to use available cheap material(Because of money limiting).
    But. Thanks anyway.
     
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