A new epistemology of Relativity

  • Thread starter Raparicio
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In summary: This conversation seems to be centered around a new theory of relativity, which typically falls under the realm of physics. However, it also mentions the possibility of it being an epistemological theory, which would fall under the realm of philosophy. It may be best to seek advice from both physicists and philosophers to determine the most appropriate category for your theory.
  • #1
Raparicio
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I have a new theory of relativity, that has been very successfull since now. where can I send it to be reviewed?

my best reggards.
 
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  • #2
If this is a physical theory, you can submit to any number of physics journals. If it's an epistemological theory, then I suppose you can post it here for commentary if you don't feel confident with philosophy journals. Note, however, that if your theory is a theory of physics, submitting it here would be a violation of forum policy. We try not to discuss speculative scientific ideas until after they have been peer reviewed. We don't provide the peer review.
 
  • #3
Net theories

loseyourname said:
If this is a physical theory, you can submit to any number of physics journals. If it's an epistemological theory, then I suppose you can post it here for commentary if you don't feel confident with philosophy journals. Note, however, that if your theory is a theory of physics, submitting it here would be a violation of forum policy. We try not to discuss speculative scientific ideas until after they have been peer reviewed. We don't provide the peer review.

Do u know experts that could evaluate a physics theory?
 
  • #4
Preferably, someone developing a theory of physics would be an expert in physics. You should at least colloborate with a physicist if you're going to be developing physical theories. I believe you're free to use these forums to ask any questions you have, so if you want to know whether or not any specific aspect of your theory makes sense given what physicists already know, I'm sure you can do that at least.
 

Related to A new epistemology of Relativity

1. What is "A new epistemology of Relativity"?

"A new epistemology of Relativity" is a scientific theory proposed by theoretical physicist Albert Einstein in 1915. It is a fundamental theory that explains the relationship between space and time and how they are affected by gravity.

2. How does this new epistemology differ from the previous understanding of Relativity?

The previous understanding of Relativity, known as Galilean Relativity, was based on Newton's laws of motion and did not take into account the effects of gravity. "A new epistemology of Relativity" built upon Galilean Relativity and introduced the concept of spacetime, which explains how gravity affects both space and time.

3. What evidence supports this new epistemology of Relativity?

There is a significant amount of evidence that supports "A new epistemology of Relativity." This includes the observed bending of starlight by the sun's gravity, the precession of Mercury's orbit, and the time dilation observed in experiments with high-speed particles. Additionally, the predictions made by the theory have been confirmed through numerous experiments and observations.

4. How does "A new epistemology of Relativity" impact our understanding of the universe?

"A new epistemology of Relativity" revolutionized our understanding of the universe by providing a more accurate and comprehensive explanation of how gravity works. It has also led to the development of other important theories, such as the Big Bang theory and black hole theory.

5. Can we apply this new epistemology to other areas of science?

Yes, "A new epistemology of Relativity" has had a significant impact on other areas of science, such as cosmology, astrophysics, and quantum mechanics. It has also influenced our understanding of the nature of light, energy, and matter. Many modern technologies, such as GPS systems, also rely on the principles of "A new epistemology of Relativity" for their accuracy and functionality.

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