Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

A new weight-loss pill

  1. Mar 12, 2005 #1

    saltydog

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    In the interest of Biochemisty I sat through an infomercial about a new weight-loss pill: Satise. This pill claims to contains a protein derived from a potato which promotes satiety (hence the name) thus affecting weight loss.

    The infomercial mentioned cholecystokinin (rather quickly).

    Cholecystokinin is normally secreted from the small intestines in the presence of partially digested fats and proteins. This in turns stimulates the pancreas and gallbladder to deliver digestive enzymes. It, in conjunction with leptin, also affects neurons in the brain to promote satiety.

    Wouldn't stomach acids break up ingested cholecystokinin before it can affect the pancreas and gall bladder? I don't think Satise works for this reason but I could be wrong.

    Ummmm . . . my turkey's startin' to smell good . . .
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 12, 2005 #2

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Unless they had a method of delivery to get it past the stomach, you're right, it would just get digested in the stomach as any other protein (it is a protein hormone, by the way).

    I haven't looked into literature on CCK in a very very very long time (as in, before leptin and adiponectin were even discovered). My gut reaction is that if it did what they claimed, they wouldn't need to be selling it on an infomercial, although there are often half-truths to these things, so I can look up and see what I find to satisfy your curiousity about a CCK/leptin mechanism. I do know leptin isn't as simple as everyone hoped when they first discovered it either (but isn't that always the case).
     
  4. Mar 12, 2005 #3

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Looks like it might work for a very short time, but it's not going to work for long. From a rather long review article on hormones and food intake, here's an excerpt from a section on CCK, with bold emphasis added by me:

    Source: Strader AD, Woods SC.
    Gastrointestinal hormones and food intake.
    Gastroenterology. 2005 Jan;128(1):175-91.
    http://www2.us.elsevierhealth.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?retrieve=/pii/S0016508504019936&nav=full
    (You may need an institutional subscription for the link to work.)
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2005
  5. Mar 12, 2005 #4

    saltydog

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Thanks Moonbear. I assume "ip" means intra-peritoneal meaning I suspect they injected CCK directly into the abdomen and into the gut. Surely that would be more efficacious then oral means because of the effect of stomach acid on the peptide.

    My interest is not diet related, just the biochemistry and my empathy for weight loss endeavours suffered by many.
     
  6. Mar 12, 2005 #5
    There are enough diet pills in the world with a host of chemicals that don't belong in your body in large concentrations than they are supposed to be. Whatever happened to good old fashioned exercise and portion control? These people obviously don't realize how good you can feel after a nice jog or swim.
     
  7. Mar 12, 2005 #6

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Yes, that's intra-peritoneal. The injection doesn't go into the gut, but into the peritoneal cavity. From there, it's pretty rapidly absorbed into circulation. Yes, this would be a more rapid way of getting a drug into circulation than orally. There are ways to get drugs past the stomach to release contents lower in the intestine, but I don't know how this weight-loss pill is manufactured. Frequently, if something needs to get past the stomach, it will be in a capsule form. The capsule dissolves in the mouth or stomach, and then the smaller "beads" inside the capsule are made so they don't dissolve in the stomach, but do in the small intestine when the pH changes and enzymes differ.

    misskitty, as long as there are people in the world unwilling to consider exercise and portion control to be a viable means of maintaining their weight-loss, and who remain ignorant about biology, there will be snake-oil salesmen with "quick fix" pills to sell to them.
     
  8. Mar 12, 2005 #7
    How about make a medicine to 'encourage' exercise? such as overload of hormones?
     
  9. Mar 12, 2005 #8

    saltydog

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Well, thanks for telling me that. Surely then this method is used for this diet pill. That's a satisfactory answer to my question.

    Also, I too am very much into health and fitness and advocate such. Wanted to title this "embrace the agony" (of exercising) but though that might offend people with weight problems. You know, exercise is a wonderful catharsis. One-hundred thousand generations gave their lives for our superb physiology. Exercise is a celebration of that lineage!
     
  10. Mar 12, 2005 #9
    My earlier comment wasn't intended to be derrogatory. I'm sorry if it was. I'm sorry if I offended anyone in making the comment. It disturbs me that there are people who would take those "quick-fix" pills or try them to see if they work. I just can't see how people can market these drugs to others, knowing they don't work, and still sleep a night. Maybe I'm just too hooked on the energy and that "I worked hard and I LOVE it" feeling I get from therapy (Believe Me! There is a TON of exercise involved with therapy.)
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?