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A new word?

  1. Aug 10, 2008 #1
    Hi all,

    I do not know if English has a word to describe this. Lets say there are 3 tenderers A, B, C who are in a bid (for smt). But in fact only tenderer A is the only one who wants to win. B and C are just there (because the law requires 3 units) so they wishes to lose and after that they can have some benefit from tenderer A. Of course they have agreed in before that

    I do not know whether there are words to describe tenderer A and tenderers B , C in this case? I just think of DECOY, but it seems not correct.
    Any help will be appreciated.
    Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 10, 2008 #2
    What's a "tenderer"?
     
  4. Aug 10, 2008 #3
    Who participates in a bid , similar to a bidder (try to gain a work ..)
     
  5. Aug 10, 2008 #4

    Evo

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  6. Aug 10, 2008 #5
    They also seem to be in cartel

    The government wants perfect/monopolistic competition (economics definition) but due to lack of competitors they are joining together to get more profits (this is illegal in NA)...?
     
  7. Aug 10, 2008 #6

    Evo

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    I don't think cartel is what he's looking for in his scenario, though.
     
  8. Aug 10, 2008 #7
    Thanks for your ideas.
    Anyway, accomplice is too general, I mean the X-word is more used in bidding, tenderring ect.., It's narrow (and it's to describe smt illigal, so probably it's a slang)
    cartel is not used in this, I think
     
  9. Aug 10, 2008 #8
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2008
  10. Aug 10, 2008 #9
    A ringer. See the third definition in the Thesaurus section.
    Free Dictionary
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2008
  11. Aug 10, 2008 #10

    Evo

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    I had thought of shill, but a "shill" as more of someone who distracts others from what is going on.

    The definition of a shill

    Merriam-Webster

    shill

    1 a: one who acts as a decoy

    http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary

    See, wikipedia agrees, they don't participate, they act on the side.

    jimmy's definition of ringer seems to fit what the OP is looking for

    jimmy wins, he shoots, he scores
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2008
  12. Aug 11, 2008 #11

    Moonbear

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    It's called corruption. Probably qualifies as collusion too, between the three contractors, for the sake of a kick-back for helping the winner get the bid.

    I think another term for it is "government contractors." :biggrin: :wink:
     
  13. Aug 11, 2008 #12

    Astronuc

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    "rigged" is the adjective that describes a process which has a predetermined outcome, as in "rigged election", or "rigged bid", which is illegal - at least in the US and most countries.

    See - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bid_rigging

    One would have to dig into the specific laws to find the terms for the participants, but conspirator or accomplice would probably fit.

     
  14. Aug 11, 2008 #13

    LowlyPion

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    Co-conspirators should work, for US legal purposes anyway. The parties would have conspired among themselves to subvert the bidding process. Insofar as the conspiracy would be concerned they would all be co-conspirators and equally liable.
     
  15. Aug 11, 2008 #14
    tenderer; more soft or delicate in substance; not hard or tough

    so this whole thing made no sense to me
     
  16. Aug 11, 2008 #15

    arildno

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    Dearly Missed

    I think he meant contender..
     
  17. Aug 11, 2008 #16

    arildno

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    B and C fills up, in a way, positions so that A is guaranteed to win.

    I wonder what sort of competition would work for something like this, since it:
    a) Seems to require that three, and only three, are allowed to join in the competion
    and
    b) That B and C have the opportunity to withdraw themselves at a stage where the one arranging the competition cannot issue a "re-match" (i.e, so that A is guaranteed winning)
     
  18. Aug 11, 2008 #17

    Evo

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    I think he might have meant tenderer as someone who is trading (bartering, tendering).
     
  19. Aug 11, 2008 #18

    Astronuc

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    The English use "tenderer" as the US uses "bidder", at least that's what I have seen in RFQs or RFPs and responses at companies where I've worked.

    Tender (n) is a formal offer, and typically in business (as opposed to Law), it is a written offer to contract goods or services at a specified cost or rate, i.e. a bid.
     
  20. Aug 11, 2008 #19

    BobG

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    Moonbear is right with collusion. Major league baseball owners were found guilty of collusion in bidding for free agent players some time ago. They arranged not to outbid for certain players in return for other teams not outbidding them on players they wanted to obtain.

    Contractors could easily do the same, except agreeing not to underbid each other's bid with each contractor getting the amount of business they can handle, but at a higher profit for each job.

    Of course, the problem with contractors trying to use collusion is that someone outside the agreement can slide in and underbid the contractor's that colluded with each other, so it only works in limited circumstances for short periods of time, even if it weren't usually illegal. In baseball, the owners control the number of teams that can play in the league, so collusion worked very well for them .... at least until they were caught.
     
  21. Aug 11, 2008 #20

    Evo

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    It depends, he seems to be asking what the people are called, not what they are guilty of. If you read the OP, he said the word he found was "decoy" but that wasn't the word he was looking for. I still think jimmy's "ringer" defintion fits the best, at least so far.

    There might be another slang term for what you would call the person, but I can't think of one.
     
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