Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

A question about Protons

  1. Jun 20, 2015 #1
    When an atom vibrates more than usual, say for example effected by a sound wave, do it's protons repel each other further apart than normal? Thus more charged virtual Pions occurring and decaying (discombobulating) into virtual W+ bosons?

    Edit: I know that accelerated charged particles create a magnetic field but I don't want to assume things.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2015
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 20, 2015 #2

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    There is no sound strong enough to influence the internal structure of nuclei. The materials simply cannot transmit the massive forces needed for that. You would completely evaporate and ionize your sample in the attempt.
    Virtual particles are not real. You cannot count them.
     
  4. Jun 20, 2015 #3
    atomic vibration is natural, if say I plucked a Guitar string it would oscilate very fast, the atoms moving faster bumping the atoms around it which would continue into a pressure wave

    Pions bring protons together, when protons come further apart they become charged pions to make up for the distance

    protons repell eachother, the more protons move the more of a magnetic field they create

    the guitar string is made up of atoms so the protons in each atom would be moving more

    in this example would there be more not real charged pions? thankyou for the responce so far i will try harder in future to make my questions clearer
     
  5. Jun 20, 2015 #4

    mfb

    User Avatar
    2016 Award

    Staff: Mentor

    There are no real pions at all.

    The scales are completely different. It's like trying to rip apart a solid object by standing next to it and hoping that the own gravitational attraction will split it. It won't.
    Let's say the guitar string oscillates by 1cm with 1 kHz. That makes 200 km/s^2 peak acceleration, or a force of 3*10-22 N on a single proton to follow that motion. This has to be compared with typical energies of 10 MeV and typical distances of 1 fm in a nucleus, which gives a typical force of about 1kN. The oscillation is 23 orders of magnitude weaker than the forces inside a nucleus. A factor of 100000000000000000000000!
    Actually, trying to rip a solid object apart by standing next to it is much more "realistic", just ~15 orders of magnitude.
     
  6. Jun 21, 2015 #5
    Hey that's some interesting stuff right there, I'm not trying to rip apart, evaporate or ionize atoms here. I looked into sound energy and it's kinetic. The more the Earth spins, the more the lava inside moves thus more magnetic fields, that's what I mean by protons moving.

    And thank you again mfb you have answered my question :)
     
  7. Jun 21, 2015 #6
    You have the wrong model of the atom in your mind ...
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook