A question concerning density, mathematical proof.

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of "empty space" and whether it truly exists or not. The speakers bring up the idea that mathematics and physics may not accurately reflect reality, and question whether matter is infinitely dense or if "empty space" is simply a mathematical model.
  • #1
Dragongod
51
0
Current science describes a solid, liquid, and gas, as having different densities. Solids have the highest density, then comes liquids, and finally gases. They say in between the particles lies "empty space." Can someone please describe to me the properties of "empty space" because as fas as I can logically reason, its impossible for "nothingness" (the absense of matter and energy)" to exist.

Also, mathematics currently states that one can divide infinitely into any value. Doesn't this show that matter is already infinitely dense, meaning that "empty space" (the absense of matter and energy) doesn't actually exist. Doesn't this basically state that matter is filled infinitely with more matter? If this is true then Stephen Hawking's definition of a black hole having a singularity would not hold up because all matter would already be a singularity(infinite matter, no room for empty space) in of itself.
 
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  • #2
Dragongod said:
Also, mathematics currently states that one can divide infinitely into any value. Doesn't this show that matter is already infinitely dense, meaning that "empty space" (the absense of matter and energy) doesn't actually exist. Doesn't this basically state that matter is filled infinitely with more matter?
No, you are confusing a mathematical MODEL with reality.
 
  • #3
lol HAHAHAHA, I am confusing a mathematical model with reality. If that is true doesn't that show that math isn't consistent with reality and therefore neither are the formulas we use in physics to determine reality. As far as I know mathematicians and physicists would greatly disagree with you. But this is another topic. Let's just say mathematics is consistant with reality. If it is, just supposing, wouldn't my conclusion be right. Wouldn't it mean that matter is already infinitely dense, that "empty space" doesn't actually exist.
 
  • #4
Dragongod said:
lol HAHAHAHA, I am confusing a mathematical model with reality. If that is true doesn't that show that math isn't consistent with reality and therefore neither are the formulas we use in physics to determine reality. As far as I know mathematicians and physicists would greatly disagree with you. But this is another topic. Let's just say mathematics is consistant with reality. If it is, just supposing, wouldn't my conclusion be right. Wouldn't it mean that matter is already infinitely dense, that "empty space" doesn't actually exist.


No, that simply says that "reality" and a mathematical model for reality are not the same thing. The fact is that there exist many different mathematical models for the same "physical facts" (which is what I think you mean by "reality"). No mathematical model can fit any physical facts perfectly because physical facts are always based on imperfect measurements.

I'm not sure what you mean by " Let's just say mathematics is consistant with reality. " Different mathematical models match "reality" to differing degrees of accuracy. I don't know of any mathematical model that says "matter is already infinitely dense" (I don't even know any mathematical model in which "infinitely dense" is defined) so I don't see how saying a mathematical model is consistent with reality would lead one to conclude that.
 

1. What is density and how is it calculated?

Density is a measure of an object's mass per unit volume. It is calculated by dividing the mass of the object by its volume.

2. How is density used in scientific research?

Density is used in scientific research to identify and classify various substances, as each substance has a unique density. It is also used to determine the purity and composition of a substance.

3. What is the mathematical proof for density?

The mathematical proof for density is the equation density = mass/volume. This equation is derived from the basic definition of density as mass per unit volume.

4. How does density affect the behavior of matter?

Density affects the behavior of matter by determining its buoyancy, compressibility, and ability to mix with other substances. It also plays a role in determining the state of matter (solid, liquid, or gas) at a given temperature and pressure.

5. How does the density of an object change with temperature and pressure?

The density of an object can change with temperature and pressure. In general, as temperature increases, the density of a substance decreases. For gases, as pressure increases, the density also increases. However, for liquids and solids, an increase in pressure may cause a decrease in density due to the compression of the molecules.

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