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A short easy question just stumped me.

  1. Apr 9, 2004 #1

    JasonRox

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    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    I usually get them, but this one got me stuck.

    Here it is:

    The larger of two numbers exceeds twice the smaller number by 1. Three times the smaller number is 6 more than the larger. Find the two numbers.

    Well I got it just after I finish writing it. A 5 minute break usually does it.

    Take a shot at it.

    I'll post the answers later or congragulate the lucky/smart person. :biggrin:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 9, 2004 #2
    n = 7 and m = 15.

    Do I get a cookie for paying attention in algebra class?

    cookiemonster
     
  4. Apr 10, 2004 #3
    A = 15 and B = 7. What do I get?
     
  5. Apr 10, 2004 #4

    HallsofIvy

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    Science Advisor

    Let "x" represent the larger number, "y" the smaller.

    "The larger of two numbers exceeds twice the smaller number by 1."
    x= 2y+ 1

    " Three times the smaller number is 6 more than the larger. "
    3y= x+ 6

    Since x= 2y+1, the second equation becomes 3y= 2y+1+ 6 or y= 7. Then
    x= 2(7)+ 1= 15.

    Check: 15 exceeds twice 7 by 1 and 3 times 7 (21) is 6 more than 15.
    (It's always best to check by going back to the original words- not the equations you got from the words- you might have done that wrong!)

    And the most important point- write the answer clearly:

    The larger of the two numbers is 15 and the other number is 7.

    Chen and Cookiemonster: A really sharp teacher would take a point off: the problem said nothing about "m and n" or "A and B" and so you did not in fact answer the problem.
     
  6. Apr 10, 2004 #5
    A really sharp teacher would never ask this question, so we are safe. :wink:
     
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