A sub-field of relatively employable applied/experimental physics

  • Thread starter wj2cho
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  • #1
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Hello,

I am a rising sophomore at university majoring in physics. Since high school and through university lectures and labs, I have discovered that applied/experimental physics is my cup of tea and I wish to pursue a doctorate degree. But also, I do not wish to be drowning with debts after I graduate, so I would rather pursue a sub-field that is relatively employable since I enjoy all physics. I have taken programming courses in Python and C and will take C++ and get some hands-on experience for programming for experiments.

Here's one problem. I am color-blind. I did not choose electrical engineering because I could not read the colors of resistor bands with certainty. Will this exclude any of the possible options?
 

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  • #2
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when you study in physics is there a problem? because you partially color blind?
 
  • #3
ZapperZ
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Hello,

I am a rising sophomore at university majoring in physics. Since high school and through university lectures and labs, I have discovered that applied/experimental physics is my cup of tea and I wish to pursue a doctorate degree. But also, I do not wish to be drowning with debts after I graduate, so I would rather pursue a sub-field that is relatively employable since I enjoy all physics. I have taken programming courses in Python and C and will take C++ and get some hands-on experience for programming for experiments.

Here's one problem. I am color-blind. I did not choose electrical engineering because I could not read the colors of resistor bands with certainty. Will this exclude any of the possible options?

Read this thread:

https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=410271

Being color blind is not an issue at all.

Zz.
 
  • #4
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really ? many experiment in physics its make me scare
 
  • #5
DLX
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wj2cho said:
I did not choose electrical engineering because I could not read the colors of resistor bands with certainty. Will this exclude any of the possible options?

I am "somewhat" colour blind and I finished the electronic engineering course without too much difficulty. It's doable, colour blindness is much less of an issue than it is made out to be :)
 

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