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a sucker born every minute

  1. Jun 30, 2005 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    G-Force indicator to prevent "G-Face" :rofl:
    http://www.motormate.com/gwhiz/index.php

    They are really selling these!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 30, 2005 #2

    Moonbear

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    :rofl: I'm trying to figure out what it is from that picture. Does it look to you like just a bubble level? :rofl: Oh, wait, look, I think this smiley has g-face! ---> :rolleyes:
     
  4. Jun 30, 2005 #3
    I don't get it... what is it supposed to be?

    *sigh* I'm just too "Smart" to get these things arn't I? :frown:
     
  5. Jun 30, 2005 #4
    On the first order page, there was no lock sign in the bottom right. Which means your information isn't secure, no encryption in any form. When will they ever learn. And no I wasn't going to order one.
     
  6. Jun 30, 2005 #5
    The only thing the "lock sign" (HTTPS) protects you from is attacks utilizing your own local network. If someone has access to your network (or computer, via a trojan) they can sniff out the information you send, but if you're using a reliable ISP, once it reaches them, you don't have anything to worry about. Unless, of course, there's a problem at the other end, on the server's network, which HTTPS won't hardly do any good protecting you from anyway.
     
  7. Jun 30, 2005 #6
    Is it supposed to be some kind of accelerometer? I can't figure out how it would work - from the picture it looks like it has some kind of fluid in a curved tube (?). Any ideas?
     
  8. Jun 30, 2005 #7

    chroot

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    Minor quibble: this is incorrect. HTTPS is a secure cryptographic protocol between two computers -- yours and the server. Your local network and ISP have absolutely nothing to do with it, nor does the local network of the server. Unless your computer is compromised, or the server is compromised, your data is secure.

    - Warren
     
  9. Jun 30, 2005 #8
    You didn't understand what I was saying. I didn't say your local network or ISP have anything to do with HTTPS; what I said was that all HTTPS protects against is attacks aimed at sniffing packets through your local network.
     
  10. Jun 30, 2005 #9

    Lisa!

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    What about you avatar, Ivan!It's not one of them! :wink:
     
  11. Jun 30, 2005 #10

    russ_watters

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    Its an accelerometer and I'm sure it really works, but the ad is a joke (gee, that's never happened before, has it?). I think its a neat idea.

    Yes, its a fluid in a curved tube just like a level. Hang it upright and the force of gravity will move the bubble in either direction.
     
  12. Jun 30, 2005 #11
    It started for a ad for the Mini Cooper car, which was in my book a pretty lame ad, showing grimice like faces after turning a corner fast.
     
  13. Jun 30, 2005 #12

    russ_watters

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    Yeah, I'm not saying its a good ad (like those "help prevent taste loss" beer commercials :rolleyes: ), but I could see Fast 'n Furious car freaks buying something like this. Lateral g-forces are, after all, tested by car magazines.
     
  14. Jun 30, 2005 #13

    DaveC426913

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    It's not gravity that moves the bubble, it's centrifugal force* in a tight turn. The device is meant to measure G's in a turn.



    (*yeah, yeah, I know CF doesn't really exist, it's actually inertia, but in this case, for all intents and purposes, it does exist.)
     
  15. Jun 30, 2005 #14

    Moonbear

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    I see, so it is just a bubble level, you just mount it differently than it's shown in the picture. :rofl:
     
  16. Jun 30, 2005 #15

    Ivan Seeking

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    Yes, there are a few people who might actually use it while breaking the law and possibly endangering other people. :rolleyes: I mean, I would have used it! But you know most people will buy this, stick it on, and forget all about it before the credit card bill is even paid. But for serious car freaks who enjoy a good 0.8g now and again, instead of watching the road, it would be fun to watch the Gwhiz while negotiating a 25mph turn at 50 mph. :biggrin:
     
  17. Jun 30, 2005 #16

    chroot

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    This is not true. HTTPS protects against any kind of sniffing attacks, regardless of where they occur. Why on earth would it matter -where- an attacker gets access to the packets anyway?

    - Warren
     
  18. Jun 30, 2005 #17
    It's a matter of being practical. Your packets don't just float around the internet. They take definite routes (and before you try to correct me here, let me be clear that of course different packets often take different routes) from your computer to the server. You'd have to be pretty paranoid to worry about HTTP packets being intercepted once once they reach your ISP.

    My point was HTTPS isn't really that big of a deal, and I'd worry much more about whether sites that you give information to have the ability to keep that information secure with or without HTTPS. If Apple didn't use HTTPS, I'd still feel safe because I know my computer and local network are safe and I know Apple is safe, so I wouldn't just not give them my information on the basis of them not having HTTPS. If, however, some 3rd rate site did use HTTPS, I'd steel feel insecure about giving them my information.
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2005
  19. Jun 30, 2005 #18

    chroot

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    You are correct that the most common kind of information theft occurs at the server itself, not as the information is transmitted over the internet. You should indeed worry more about the people at the other end of the network cable than the network cable itself. That said, your description of how https works, and the protection it affords, was woefully inaccurate.

    - Warren
     
  20. Jun 30, 2005 #19

    russ_watters

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    Sorry, I got to thinking about a ship's clinometer... Same device, different purpose.
     
  21. Jun 30, 2005 #20

    Janus

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    Reminds me of the ball and tube from a turn-and-slip indicator. (An instrument used to coordinate turns with an Aircraft.)
     
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