A supernova can out light a entire galaxy

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a supernova can out light a entire galaxy. Ive read it can give out about 10^44J of energy is there anyone of you who now the amount of energy released mor exacly or even better know how to calculate it? i love calculating stuff.
 

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  • #2
Labguy
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Zelos said:
a supernova can out light a entire galaxy. Ive read it can give out about 10^44J of energy is there anyone of you who now the amount of energy released mor exacly or even better know how to calculate it? i love calculating stuff.
From these, and links, you can get info on the energy release of a Type Ia and Type II supernova, respectively.

http://www.astro.rug.nl/~onderwys/ACTUEELONDERZOEK/JAAR2001/jakob/nucleo.html [Broken]

http://home.earthlink.net/~rarydin/selfc.html
 
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thank you labguy
kinda crappy, its using none SI units. else than that its good
 
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  • #4
Astronuc
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Latest Supernovae - http://www.rochesterastronomy.org/snimages/

Some images show supernovaes outshining galaxies.


The energy release from the thermonuclear burning (~1044 J) - from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supernova, which also contains statements
As the density in the collapsing core skyrockets, electrons and protons are pushed together until their electrical attraction overcomes their inherent nuclear repulsion from each other. This combination, a process called "electron capture", creates a neutron and releases a neutrino. The neutrinos escape from the core, carrying away energy and further accelerating the collapse, which proceeds in milliseconds as the core detaches from the outer layers of the star and reaches the density of nuclear matter, where the neutrons press against each other and the entire core is the density of an atomic nucleus. This is the core collapse. At this point neutron degeneracy pressure is sufficient to balance gravity; however the core has actually overshot the equilibrium point and undergoes a slight bounce, creating a shock wave which slams into the collapsing outer layers of the star. A "proto-neutron star" begins to form at the core, though if it is massive enough, it will continue collapsing to form a black hole.

The core collapse phase is known to be so dense and energetic that only neutrinos are able to escape the collapsing star. Most of gravitational potential energy of the collapse gets converted to a 10 second neutrino burst, releasing about 1046 joules (100 foes). Of this energy, about 1044 J (1 foe) is reabsorbed by the star producing an explosion. The energy per particle in a supernova is typically 1 to 150 picojoules (tens to hundreds of MeV). The neutrinos produced by a supernova have been actually observed in the case of Supernova 1987A leading astronomers to conclude that the core collapse picture is basically correct.

This energy is small enough that the standard model of particle physics is likely to be basically correct, but the high densities may include corrections to the standard model. In particular, earth based accelerators can produce particle interactions which are of much higher energy than are found in supernova, but these experiments involve individual particles interacting with individual particles, and it is likely that the high densities within the supernova will produce novel effects. The interactions between neutrinos and the other particles in the supernova take place with the weak nuclear force which is believed to be well understood. However, the interactions between the protons and neutrons involve the strong nuclear force which is much less well understood.
 
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  • #5
ek
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Zelos said:
ts using none SI units
Just as an FYI, 1 foe = 1E51 ergs = 1E44 joules.
 
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Just some bragging here, I actually took the spectra for SN 2005df (first on the list Astronuc provided)a couple of days after it was discovered at Siding Springs observatory. The spectra provided the information necessary to determine that it was a type 1a supernova.
 

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