A textbook problem

89
0
I have a textbook problem I am trying to solve with no luck.
I know 1/(u^2 -1) = 1/2 [ 1/(u-1) - 1/(u+1) ]
I come so far to see that 1/(u^2 -1) = 1/ [(u-1)(u+1) ]
But I don't know what comes next. Could somebody please give me a hint.
 

Physics Monkey

Science Advisor
Homework Helper
1,364
34
Hint: This is called partial fraction decomposition, and you can think of it as the opposite of finding a common denominator.
 

TD

Homework Helper
1,020
0
Well you factored your denominator correctly. Now try to work the other way arround. "Suppose" you can split your fraction into two parts, and then try to find the right coefficients. So suppose that:

[tex]\frac{1}{{u^2 - 1}} = \frac{A}{{u - 1}} + \frac{B}{{u + 1}}[/tex]

Now try to find A and B.
 
89
0
Thanks, it worked.
 

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