A very specific equilibrium reaction

In summary, it is possible to set up a coupled reaction between two chemicals in equilibrium that meets the criteria of producing power quickly, using different sources of energy, and being able to start and stop the reaction as needed.
  • #1
infamous_Q
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Ok. is it possible for an two chemicals in an equilibrium to be set up so that..:

1) reaction in direction A produces lots of power, quickly, which is used up by something else
2) reaction in opposite direction, direction A', uses a different source of power to get enough energy to react, but needs very little power, and it reacts even quicker than reaction in direction A.
3) the reaction can be started and stopped (either by introduction/removal of something, or another method) whenever it needs to be.

i know this is probably impossible...but hey, anyone want to give'r a go? lol
 
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  • #2
Yes, it is possible to set up an equilibrium between two chemicals that meets all of the criteria you outlined. This type of equilibrium is called a coupled reaction and it involves two different reactions that are connected together. The first reaction produces the desired product and the second reaction uses a different source of energy to convert the product of the first reaction into an alternative form. This type of equilibrium can be started or stopped by introducing or removing one of the reactants or by changing a parameter such as temperature or pressure.
 
  • #3


It is definitely possible for a chemical reaction to have different rates in different directions and for the reaction to be started and stopped at will. This is known as a reversible reaction and is a fundamental concept in chemical equilibrium. In a reversible reaction, the reactants can form products and the products can also reform the reactants. This means that the reaction can proceed in both directions simultaneously, with the rate of each direction depending on the concentrations of the reactants and products.

To address the specific scenario mentioned, it is possible for a reaction in one direction (A) to produce a lot of power quickly, while the reaction in the opposite direction (A') requires a different source of power and proceeds at a faster rate. This can be achieved by manipulating the concentrations of the reactants and products or by using a catalyst to increase the rate of one direction.

Additionally, the reaction can be controlled and started/stopped by introducing or removing certain substances that either promote or inhibit the reaction. This is commonly seen in industrial processes where the reaction is carefully controlled to optimize production.

Overall, while it may not be possible to have a reaction that meets all the specific criteria mentioned, it is certainly possible to have a reversible reaction with different rates in different directions and the ability to control and start/stop the reaction as needed.
 

1. What is meant by a specific equilibrium reaction?

A specific equilibrium reaction is a chemical reaction in which the reactants and products are present in a specific ratio and the concentrations of the reactants and products remain constant over time. This means that the forward and reverse reactions occur at the same rate, resulting in a stable equilibrium state.

2. How is the equilibrium constant (K) determined for a specific equilibrium reaction?

The equilibrium constant is determined by dividing the product of the concentrations of the products (raised to their respective stoichiometric coefficients) by the product of the concentrations of the reactants (also raised to their respective stoichiometric coefficients). This value remains constant at a given temperature and is a measure of the extent to which the reaction proceeds towards products.

3. What factors can affect the equilibrium position of a specific equilibrium reaction?

The equilibrium position can be affected by changes in temperature, pressure, and the concentrations of the reactants and products. For example, increasing the temperature can shift the equilibrium towards the endothermic reaction, while increasing the pressure can favor the side with fewer moles of gas.

4. Can a specific equilibrium reaction be shifted to favor the reactants?

Yes, a specific equilibrium reaction can be shifted to favor the reactants by changing the conditions of the reaction, such as decreasing the temperature or increasing the pressure. This will cause the equilibrium to shift towards the exothermic reaction, resulting in a higher concentration of reactants.

5. How can Le Chatelier's principle be applied to a specific equilibrium reaction?

Le Chatelier's principle states that when a system in equilibrium is subjected to a change, it will adjust in such a way as to minimize the effect of that change. For a specific equilibrium reaction, this means that if a stress (such as a change in temperature or pressure) is applied, the equilibrium will shift to counteract that stress and maintain a constant equilibrium constant.

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