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A wave with no frequency

  1. Feb 15, 2006 #1
    I'm not quite sure if this thread belongs here, but what would you call one wave that has no frequency. Zero Hz? A mobius ?:confused:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 15, 2006 #2

    Pengwuino

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    It would not be much of a wave without a frequency. I suppose maybe the cloest thing that at least i can think of is a standing wave. It has a frequency but the frequency and motion of the wave are such that the wave does appear to move.
     
  4. Feb 15, 2006 #3

    Claude Bile

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    Even standing waves have well defined frequency components. All waves possess a frequency spectrum, the 0 Hz point is included in such a spectrum (even negative frequencies).

    There really is no ambiguity here. All waves have a spectrum.

    Claude.
     
  5. Feb 15, 2006 #4

    Tide

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    How about calling it a "static field?"
     
  6. Feb 15, 2006 #5
    Yes, I see- a wave that does not have an iteration (due to reflection) appears to be motionless within a frame of time.
     
  7. Feb 15, 2006 #6
    Is there a specific static field that can be described as having a moebius form?
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2006
  8. Feb 15, 2006 #7

    chroot

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    A wave with zero frequency is a flat line. Just look at any wave equation.

    - Warren
     
  9. Feb 15, 2006 #8

    vanesch

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    I don't see what it even would *mean* for a field to have a moebius form, after all, it is a manifold and not a field, no ?
     
  10. Feb 15, 2006 #9

    berkeman

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    Before we can answer the question, we need to see the equation for this "wave" amplitude vs. time. Can you post what you mean?
     
  11. Feb 16, 2006 #10
    I'm not using an equation. It is a visible image.
     
  12. Feb 16, 2006 #11

    berkeman

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    Well, can you write an equation for it so we can "see" it too? Or else attach a JPG picture of it?
     
  13. Feb 16, 2006 #12
    I can't tell you much without making my patent lawyer upset. I will have plenty of images and a great description of my invention on my website within a couple of weeks.
     

    Attached Files:

  14. Feb 16, 2006 #13

    chroot

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    You're not going to get meaningful answers with a meaningless question and a meaningless picture, pinestone. :rolleyes:

    - Warren
     
  15. Feb 16, 2006 #14
    I guess we will all have to wait...
     
  16. Feb 16, 2006 #15

    chroot

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    If your patent lawyer knew what he was doing, he could file a provisional patent application for you in a matter of hours. This would establish a first filing date and immeditely begin providing legal protection. Then you could share your project's details without fear of legal problems.

    Otherwise, I'm afraid your questions and picture are entirely non-sensical.

    - Warren
     
  17. Feb 16, 2006 #16
    Some things you just can't rush into:cool:
     
  18. Feb 16, 2006 #17

    chroot

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    I take it you don't know how to the patent process works, then. Patents are all about rushing.

    - Warren
     
  19. Feb 16, 2006 #18
    I do know how the process works, that is why we are doing it right the first time. My last patent cost me a small fortune because the patent office wasn't satisfied the first couple of times around. It must be nice using someone elses lab and resources. Kinda like living at home with mom:biggrin:
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2006
  20. Feb 16, 2006 #19

    chroot

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    And why wasn't the patent office satisfied with your previous applications?

    - Warren
     
  21. Feb 16, 2006 #20
    Because I tried to rush it through and there were some questionable items. ($2000.00 extra, each time).
     
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