A way to increase intelligence? (1 Viewer)

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Well the author claims you can vastly increase your intelligence by simply swimming underwater for a couple of weeks.

I want to know what you guys think, and if it would even be safe to try:

http://www.geniusbydesign.com/other/windocs/guarante/guaran3.shtml

My own opinion right now is a bit muddled...still trying to research.
 

Moonbear

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Looks like complete crackpottery. The whole bit about breathing distracting from your attention is nonsense. Breathing is an autonomic function...you don't have to think about it or give it any attention at all to do it. You don't suddenly stop breathing if you don't think about it. Even on an intuitive level, that should be obvious.

Further, the part about increasing CO2 levels to the brain makes no sense either. Increasing CO2 reaching the brain would be deleterious, not helpful.

As for the question of safety, it's not recommending you exceed whatever amount of time you can comfortably hold your breath, so there shouldn't be any problem with safety, if you just want to prove to yourself it doesn't work. I'd say that my sister and I spent way more time than that underwater as kids (we used to have contests of who could stay underwater longest, or swim the deepest on the deep end of the pool all summer long). The biggest danger is getting swimmer's ear (a very painful ear infection) from all the water in your ears. Spending an hour a day getting any type of exercise is good for overall health, so take that how you want.
 
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Rach3

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Agreed, it's obvious crackpottery. But swimming is very good for your health regardless.
 

Evo

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:rofl: Where DO these people come from?
 

wolram

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Moonbear said:
Looks like complete crackpottery. The whole bit about breathing distracting from your attention is nonsense. Breathing is an autonomic function...you don't have to think about it or give it any attention at all to do it. You don't suddenly stop breathing if you don't think about it. Even on an intuitive level, that should be obvious.

Further, the part about increasing CO2 levels to the brain makes no sense either. Increasing CO2 reaching the brain would be deleterious, not helpful.

As for the question of safety, it's not recommending you exceed whatever amount of time you can comfortably hold your breath, so there shouldn't be any problem with safety, if you just want to prove to yourself it doesn't work. I'd say that my sister and I spent way more time than that underwater as kids (we used to have contests of who could stay underwater longest, or swim the deepest on the deep end of the pool all summer long). The biggest danger is getting swimmer's ear (a very painful ear infection) from all the water in your ears. Spending an hour a day getting any type of exercise is good for overall health, so take that how you want.
Errr, MoonB, have you just proved this guy right :rofl:
 
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I would imagine that if one tried to swim underwater for a few weeks, that you'd drown...:eek:
 
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Rach3

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You're right - I misread that! If one were to try swimming underwater for weeks at a time, then of course one would become more intelligent. One would have learned a very valuable lesson.
 
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Umm, i am totally agree with that.:rofl:
 

rcgldr

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You're all missing the point. It's Darwin in action. Since only the dumb ones will try this and some of them will drown, the average IQ of the remaining population will increase.

It's like the guy promising to make you smarter for a dollar. You give him the dollar, and then realize, hey, I don't feel any smarter, and the guy replies, "see, it's working already...".
 

DM

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The "gotcha" assertions are ludicrous. What a complete moron.
 

Astronuc

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Moonbear said:
Further, the part about increasing CO2 levels to the brain makes no sense either. Increasing CO2 reaching the brain would be deleterious, not helpful.
It's more a case of oxygen deprivation to the brain.

The challenge is not breathing (especially when underwater) up to the brink of unconsciousness. Such skill does come in handy when someone is trying to drown one, or torture one with the water immersion, or when infiltrating a guarded border, such as a river, or trying to escape hostile forces and the only way out is underwater. Certain naval personnel receive such training, but in most cases, underwater rebreathers are employed - which is the case when an operation is conducted with advanced planning.


I can't imagine how holding one's breath would have any effect on intelligence. Intillegence seems to be a function of the structure of the cerebral cortex, e.g. neural density, thickness, interconnections, folds in the cortex. Then there is the matter of 'training' the mind.


Herein intelligence means - "the ability to learn or understand or to deal with new or trying situations", or "the skilled use of reason (2) : the ability to apply knowledge to manipulate one's environment or to think abstractly as measured by objective criteria (as tests)".
 

Evo

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DM said:
The "gotcha" assertions are ludicrous. What a complete moron.
He lost my interest after his first "gotcha". I think he's been holding his breath too much and the lack of oxygen to his brain has left him mentally impaired.
 

Moonbear

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wolram said:
Errr, MoonB, have you just proved this guy right :rofl:
Nope...what I didn't share is that my sister was also out swimming with me, and she's a complete flake...and she spent more time underwater than I did (mainly because she wasn't very good at swimming along the surface, so just swam a lot underwater..:uhh:...no, we weren't drowning her).

About the only claim that seems consistent with my experience is that spending a lot of time underwater holding your breath will help you improve your ability to hold your breath in the future. That's how I can talk so much without stopping for breaths. :biggrin: :wink:
 

Lisa!

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Wow! And I always tried to avoid staying underwater for so long since I thought(and still think) that's dangerous for my brain.(I don't know where I got the idea that your brain cells will hurt if they don't get oxygen even for some seconds)
 

wolram

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Lisa! said:
Wow! And I always tried to avoid staying underwater for so long since I thought(and still think) that's dangerous for my brain.(I don't know where I got the idea that your brain cells will hurt if they don't get oxygen even for some seconds)
No comment, no comment, :rofl: :tongue2:
 

Lisa!

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wolram said:
No comment, no comment, :rofl: :tongue2:
:grumpy: :devil:
What's wrong here?:uhh:
 

wolram

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Lisa! said:
:grumpy: :devil:
What's wrong here?:uhh:
Often times brits take the P out of things they like, but brits are very eccentric :tongue2:
 
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Thanks for all of the responses guys.

Now, I'm a bit surprised with them.

Many of you seem to have not even read the article, and if you did you totally missed the point. His entire argument is based on the permanent expansion of the carotid arteries, which will in turn provide a GREATER flow of oxygen to the brain, thus increasing intelligence.

Two main assertions that would need to be verified before moving forward are the expansion of the carotid arteries in the presence of excess CO2, and its permanence.

If both are true, then we would go on to check the validity of it providing a great flow of oxygen. If that were true, then we could finally see if this greater oxygen flow had any impact on intelligence.

To dismiss it as crackpottery just because at first glance it sounds it, is a little anti-scientific, if you will, for lack of a better term.

As I posted earlier I'm not dead set on a decision, but I'm leaning towards the entire concept being fairly far fetched.

Reasons beyond the guy who wrote it sounds like a clown with his 'gotchas!' (which I totally agree with by the way) is more of what I expected.
 
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Rach3

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Noesis said:
Two main assertions that would need to be verified before moving forward are the expansion of the carotid arteries in the presence of excess CO2, and its permanence.
I see no reason that anything needs to be "verified" coming from an internet posting by a deluded crackpot with no scientific background.

Noesis said:
To dismiss it as crackpottery just because at first glance it sounds it, is a little anti-scientific, if you will, for lack of a better term.
I dismiss it because its author provides neither evidence for it, nor citations, nor even a reasonable argument. That, combined with his argument being a priori unreasonable and bizarre.

When confronted with something like this, it is not useful to say, "well, his argument seems nonsensical, but there must be the slightest chance that it has some truth, so then let's waste our personal time investigating it at every level just in case". Random ravings on the internet to not deserve that scrutiny! Statements which are backed with empirical evidence or citations to someone else's empirical evidence, which are reasonable and coherently argued, do.
 
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