Ac analysis

  • Thread starter amaresh92
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  • #1
amaresh92
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greetings,

consider a wire which is subjected to AC supply.now consider a point X anywhere on wire.
now what will be the potential of that point during the positive and negative halfcycle of sinusoidal AC?what will be the direction of current?
thanks
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
kevs926
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not only you need X, you also need time. then you need the graph of the ac source
 
  • #3
berkeman
Mentor
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greetings,

consider a wire which is subjected to AC supply.now consider a point X anywhere on wire.
now what will be the potential of that point during the positive and negative halfcycle of sinusoidal AC?what will be the direction of current?
thanks

What do you think? Why don't you draw a sketch of an AC voltage source driving a resistor divider. Sketch the AC waveforms -- what do they show?
 
  • #4
Naty1
5,607
40
An easy way to answer your question is to consider that at the point some distance from the source, the voltage (potential) will be exactly like the source voltage, just delayed a tiny bit in time to account for the finite speed of the voltage transmission...assuming the wire is a few inches or feet not tens of thousands of miles...so you have answered your own question in your post...
 
  • #5
amaresh92
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What do you think? Why don't you draw a sketch of an AC voltage source driving a resistor divider. Sketch the AC waveforms -- what do they show?


what kind of thing the voltage?
 
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  • #6
ssana
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You can check the rms values of AC voltages. Suppose if you have 220Vrms than it means your AC waveform is a sine wave having positive peak of 311 volts and negative peak of 311 volts. This means peak to peak voltages are 311+311=622 volts.
Peak Voltage = RMS Voltage x square root of 2
Thanks
 
  • #7
Averagesupernova
Science Advisor
Gold Member
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Peak Voltage = RMS Voltage x square root of 2
Thanks

Only on a sine wave.
 
  • #8
ssana
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Usually sine wave is generated from the generator coil. The alternate wave is not necessary a sine wave. It can be sawtooth wave or any alternate cycles. The above mentioned formula to calculate rms voltage is for the sine wave.
 

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