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AC vs. DC simulation

  1. Apr 15, 2006 #1
    I have a simple question about AC/DC. I expected a circuit with a given DC voltage to be equivalent to one with an AC voltage whose value (peak-to-peak) is the same (at least theoretically). For 10 V DC, I get a load voltage of 1.6667 V, whereas 10 Vp-p AC gives 1.6602 V (simulation). Are there theoretical grounds behind this result? Since my simulation was run under ideal conditions, I think I should get the same result, but it's not the case. I would like to understand why. By the way, snapshots of the circuits are attached.

    Any help is highly appreciated.

    NOTE: THE PROBES USED IN MY SIMULATION ARE ACROSS THE "RL" ONLY (NOT EXACTLY AS SHOWN IN THE FIGURES)
     

    Attached Files:

    • DC.JPG
      DC.JPG
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    • AC.JPG
      AC.JPG
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  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 15, 2006 #2
    Im not sure-- but dont you use RMS not Peak to Peak>??
     
  4. Apr 15, 2006 #3
    This really explains a lot. The RMS is the effective AC voltage value which is comparable to Vdc.

    Thanks for your input.
     
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