Acceleration and water height

  • Thread starter Swatch
  • Start date
  • #1
Swatch
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I'm having trouble with this problem here.

A U-shaped tube with a horizontal portion of length L contains a liquid. What is the difference in height between the liquid columns in the vertical arms if the tube has an acceleration toward the right?

There must be a net force to the left that presses the liquid to the left. In the right column there must be a pressure greater than the atmospheric pressure. But I don't know how to relate the length of the tube to the answer. Could someone please give me a clue how to solve this.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
mathmike
208
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why must there be a force to the left? acceleration is to the right. what makes you think that there is pressure greater than atm. on the right. could you explain your logic.
 
  • #3
Swatch
89
0
The tube accelerates to the right. The water goes to the left, so there must be a force pressing it to the left. I know its not really a force, but It helps thinking of it that way. When you drive a car in a circle your body gets pressed to the sides. Your body is not in a an inertial frame of reference neither is the water. Is this not true?
 

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