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Acceleration due to a force

  1. Jul 14, 2015 #1
    what will be the instantaneous acceleration when a force act on a body and how to calculate it?for ex if a body of mass 10kg is acted upon by a force of 100N then it accelerate by 10ms^-2 by it take some time to reach this acceleration which can be found out by equation of laws of motion but i want to find out the instantaneous acceleration after the body is subjected to a force ?how to calculate it?
     
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  3. Jul 14, 2015 #2

    A.T.

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    No, this is the instantaneous acceleration.
     
  4. Jul 14, 2015 #3
    this can also be the actual acceleration .can be found out by the equation of motion(if the friction is negligible)
     
  5. Jul 14, 2015 #4
    If the force is instantaneous, so is the acceleration. Of course in the real world forces are never instantaneous (due to slack in the system, compressibility of materials etc.) so if you want to know how long it takes to reach this acceleration you need to know how long it takes to reach this force.

    Note that the rate of change of acceleration is sometimes called "jerk", which is fairly appropriate.
     
  6. Jul 14, 2015 #5

    A.T.

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    The equation (Newtons 2nd) relates instantaneous acceleration to instantaneous net force, which includes friction.
     
  7. Jul 14, 2015 #6
    sorry friends i just confused it .in the v-t graph if the plot is constantly increasing then the acceleration is constant so instantaneous acceleration should be=actual acceleration .so if the force continuously changes the acceleration should also be continuously changing(both force and the acceleration are then instantaneous).thank you friends am i right
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2015
  8. Jul 15, 2015 #7
    acceleration (a) at any instant depends on net force (f) and mass (m):
    a = f / m
     
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