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Acceleration, force

  1. Jul 26, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    A 50.0 kg object is pulled along a horizontal surface with a horizontal net force of 250 N. A second object with a mass of 75.0 kg travels 4.00 m while changing its velocity from rest to 4.00 m/s. How many times greater is the acceleration of the 50.0 kg object than that of the 75.0 kg object?


    2. Relevant equations
    a=Fnet/m, v=d/t, a=v/t


    3. The attempt at a solution
    i tried finding acceleration of the 50 kg object by a=f/m which was 5m/s2. then to find acceleration of the 75kg object i used t=d/v to find the time so that i can plug it into the a=v/t formula. I got 4.00m/s2 for the 75 kg object. What am i doing wrong?because i cannot find the answer.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 26, 2009 #2

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    That equation only applies for constant velocity motion, but this is accelerated motion. Hint: Use the average velocity.
     
  4. Jul 26, 2009 #3
    but vf-vi still equals 4 doesnt it/
     
  5. Jul 26, 2009 #4

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    To find the time, use t = d/vave (instead of t = d/v). What's the average velocity?
     
  6. Jul 26, 2009 #5
    ok, but is the average velocity not 4?? cuz vf is 4 and vi is 0...
     
  7. Jul 26, 2009 #6
    could i use the formula (vf + vi)/2 to find it? then divide 5m/s2 by 2m/s2 to give me 2.5??
     
  8. Jul 26, 2009 #7

    Doc Al

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    Staff: Mentor

    Right--that gives you the average velocity. Then use that to find the time, then the acceleration.
     
  9. Jul 26, 2009 #8
    alrite. thanks =D
     
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