Accerlation distance etc

  • Thread starter Trail_Builder
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In summary, the conversation is about finding the distance traveled by something using a speed/time graph. The individual knows that this can be done by calculating the area under the graph, but is unsure of how to do so for the sections of acceleration and retardation. They ask if there are other ways to find the distance and mention using a kinematic equation, but are unsure if they are allowed to use it. They also mention approximating the graph as a trapezium or other shapes. The conversation ends with a clarification about the units of acceleration.
  • #1
bascially, not techinally a question, but some basic theory i need to know for the batch of qu's.

basically, i need to know how to find the distance traveled by something using a speed/time graph. i know this is area under it (curvey accerlation then constant speed then curvey retardation). so i what i though i'd do is split the graph into, accel., constant v, and retard. now i know how to find the distance traveled during constant v. but i not sure how to do with accerlation and retardation.

i know the accerlation to be 6.62m/s^2 for 2.9s and the retardation to be -1.2m/s^2 for 1s, or i 'think' it can be written as 1.2m/s^-2 ?

anyways, can someone please explain how i would find the distance traveled please :D and say if I am doint he wrong way too. thnx
 
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  • #2
Is it a requirement of the problem that you are to solely use the s/t graph? Perhaps a kinematic equation would be more appropriate here. Have you met such equations before?
 
  • #3
dont think i have, I'm only 16 and are doing the exam all other 16 year olds are doing.

well providing i could use this 'kinematic equation' i don't see why i shouldn't

i'm not exactly sure how i would find the distance traveled solely using the s/t time graph :S

thnx
 
  • #5
no sorry, that above my level, so are there any other ways then?

thnx for all the help
 
  • #6
Trail_Builder said:
no sorry, that above my level, so are there any other ways then?

thnx for all the help
I suppose you could approximate the graph as a trapezium or various other shapes and calculate an approximate area; but I'm not sure. Perhaps someone with more knowlage of GCSE level questions could chip in here...

Just one more point;
Trail_Builder said:
i know the accerlation to be 6.62m/s^2 for 2.9s and the retardation to be -1.2m/s^2 for 1s, or i 'think' it can be written as 1.2m/s^-2 ?

[tex]-1.2m/s^2 \neq 1.2m/s^{-2}[/tex]
 

1. What is acceleration?

Acceleration is the rate of change of an object's velocity over time. It is a vector quantity, meaning it has both magnitude and direction.

2. How is acceleration different from velocity?

Velocity is the rate of change of an object's position over time, while acceleration is the rate of change of an object's velocity over time. In simpler terms, velocity is the speed and direction an object is moving, while acceleration is the change in its speed and/or direction.

3. What is the formula for calculating acceleration?

The formula for acceleration is a = Δv/Δt, where a is acceleration, Δv is the change in velocity, and Δt is the change in time. This can also be written as a = (vf - vi)/t, where vf is the final velocity, vi is the initial velocity, and t is the time interval.

4. How does acceleration affect distance traveled?

The distance an object travels is directly affected by its acceleration. The greater the acceleration, the greater the change in velocity over time, and therefore the greater the distance traveled. This is because acceleration is a measure of how quickly an object is changing its speed or direction, both of which have an impact on the distance traveled.

5. What are the units of acceleration?

The SI unit for acceleration is meters per second squared (m/s^2). However, it can also be expressed in other units, such as kilometers per hour squared (km/h^2) or feet per second squared (ft/s^2), depending on the context. It is important to use consistent units when calculating acceleration to ensure accurate results.

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