Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Adding vector magnitudes

  1. Aug 30, 2004 #1

    SMS

    User Avatar

    How do you add two vector magnitudes and find x components?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 30, 2004 #2

    Integral

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    The easiest way to add vectors is by component. You then find the magnitude of the resultant. You cannot simply add magnitudes and get a meaningful result.
     
  4. Aug 30, 2004 #3

    SMS

    User Avatar

    ??

    OK, V1= of 3.0 m/s and is directed along the +x-axis. V2=2.0 m/s. So V3 = V1+V2. Right.


    I was never really shown how to add vectors.


    Thanks.
     
  5. Aug 30, 2004 #4

    Tom Mattson

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    See how you posted a magnitude and a direction there?

    You need to do that every time.

    In what direction?
     
  6. Aug 30, 2004 #5

    chroot

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

  7. Aug 31, 2004 #6
    to add vectors you have to break them down to their x and y components. ie lets say a vector has a magnitude of 'A' and an angle of 'K', you have to get the magnitude in the x and the magnitude in the y, so Ax=A cos (K) and Ay=A sin (K), now that you broke it down to Ax and Ay you can add it to other vector that you have broken down, just add the like parts like Bx+Ax and By+Ay the use the pathagorean theom to get the resultent magnitude (x^2+y^2=z^2) where z is the resultant magnitude.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Adding vector magnitudes
  1. Lots of adding (Replies: 8)

Loading...