ADHD & Ritalin

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  • #1
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I need some help here. My psychiatrist believes that its possible that my problem with focusing my attention could be a result of ADHD or my chronic depression. He prescribed Ritalin. Does anyone have first hand knowledge of what its like to take this stuff?

Thanks

Pete
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Astronuc
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It's possible that Ritalin (methylphenidate) would help. It stimulates the brain centers and helps people with ADHD 'focus'.

My son takes Concerta, a time released version of Ritalin. He really does need it to focus.

http://www.rxlist.com/cgi/generic/methylphen.htm [Broken]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methylphenidate


You might want to get a second opinion on Ritalin as a possible treatment for depression. It seems from the literature that people with anxiety, tension, or agitation should not take Concerta.

http://www.concerta.net/concerta/pages/importantprodinfo.jsp [Broken]
 
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  • #3
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You might want to get a second opinion on Ritalin as a possible treatment for depression. It seems from the literature that people with anxiety, tension, or agitation should not take Concerta.
Thanks for the response.

My psychiatrist knows me well enough to know whether what he was doing when he prescribed it to me. I 'll start taking it this Tuesday. I'll keep this thread informed of my progress so that others with concentration problems can learn of my reaction to it.

Pete
 
  • #4
baywax
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The Boston Globe report

An alternative to Ritalin prescribes exercise instead

Albani said she was doubtful, at first, of the center's contention that physical exercises like tossing a beanbag and balancing on a wobble board could improve his focus and mental processing. But after just six months in the two-year program, which costs $4,500, her son had shown impressive gains, she said.
''I was skeptical because it's not a proven treatment," she said. ''But it's helped him so much."

http://www.boston.com/news/local/ar...ative_to_ritalin_prescribes_exercise_instead/

Here's the address for the Adult ADD Support group (edit:The Dore program was created in England six years ago by Wynford Dore, who was trying to find a cure for his daughter's severe dyslexia.)

http://www.maaddsg.org/news_5_4_06.htm [Broken]


Defrauding pharmaceutical marketing claims with expert commentary.

http://www.adhdfraud.org/commentary/12-8-00-1.htm
 
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  • #5
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Are you currently on antidepressants? I had a friend that noticed when he was on antidepressants, i dont remember which, but its major effect clouded his focus. This helped him lead a happier life, but made it neigh impossible for me to tutor him in Fields. He asked his phsych about it and they refused to recommend ritalin or aderol, and instead said to start taking half doses. He did notice a difference in his focus and grades.
I'd recommend some research on related problems if your'e currently on anti depressants. And perhaps a second medical opinion.
 
  • #6
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Are you currently on antidepressants? I had a friend that noticed when he was on antidepressants, i dont remember which, but its major effect clouded his focus. This helped him lead a happier life, but made it neigh impossible for me to tutor him in Fields. He asked his phsych about it and they refused to recommend ritalin or aderol, and instead said to start taking half doses. He did notice a difference in his focus and grades.
I'd recommend some research on related problems if your'e currently on anti depressants. And perhaps a second medical opinion.
I already got a second opinion today. All my doctors, especially my psychiatrist who is the expert on what antidepresants can do, is the one who prescribed the Ritalin. As far as it works, time will tell. I have to first determine whether I can tolerate it. Then we wait to see if it either helps or hinders. Seems to me that your friend should have tried another anti-depressant, not stop them all together. That's just jumping the gun way too soon.

I recommend that your friend ask his doc for a different anti-depressant.

Pete
 
  • #7
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Yes, whatever you do, don't expect instant gratification. It may take up to three years to find what works with your particular body chemistry.
 
  • #8
baywax
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Yes, whatever you do, don't expect instant gratification. It may take up to three years to find what works with your particular body chemistry.

Try three years of the bean-bag balancing therapy and other physical excercises. Its actually better understood as a treatment than Ritalin and to say the least, anything can happen in three years. Throw some swimming in for good measure. Or try this phys ex stuff along with the Ritalin as a suppliment.
 
  • #9
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Try three years of the bean-bag balancing therapy and other physical excercises. Its actually better understood as a treatment than Ritalin and to say the least, anything can happen in three years. Throw some swimming in for good measure. Or try this phys ex stuff along with the Ritalin as a suppliment.
Due to back injury I can't exercise. I started the Ritalin today and noticed a change. So far so good!

Pete
 
  • #10
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Update - This Ritalin stuff is wonderful. I feel very different than I used to. A feeling I've never had which means the way I was before was my standard for judging my abilities to myself. Now its like a fog has lifted and I can relax. It feels like my mind was always "turned on" and this made me compulsive in my studies.

If it gets better then I will consider this the answer to my all those prayers I gave God about these problems (Yes, yes. I'm a devout Christian).

Thanks and I'll keep you updated if this gets better or degenerates and makes me ill. Wish good things for me okay folks? I would appreciated it - ower of positive thinking and all that. :smile:

Best regards

Pete
 
  • #11
Astronuc
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Best wishes and good luck for a sustained improvement. I hope it continues to work.

One might find though that the body adapts, as it does with any medication.

Exercise is a good thing to do on a regular basis, both for physical fitness and mental health.
 
  • #12
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Best wishes and good luck for a sustained improvement. I hope it continues to work.

One might find though that the body adapts, as it does with any medication.

Exercise is a good thing to do on a regular basis, both for physical fitness and mental health.
Thanks very much Astronuc. I sure wish I could exercise. A few years ago I had major surgery on it to relieve pressure on my sciatic nerve. Unfortunately I'll have to live with this pain the rest of my life. Right now we keep it under control by pain meds. I tried joining a gym to slowly get the muscles in my body stronger. I went at a snails pace and my back pain started to degenerate along with a new problem with knew pain. So I won't be able to exercise anymore.

Feels good to feel good. I don't remember my brain not racing anymore. Actually I never knew it was racing until it wasn't anymore!

Best wishes

Pete
 
  • #13
Astronuc
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One could try swimming or exercise in water. Some elderly people with arthritis or joint issues use water to help buoy the body and relieve some stress on the joints and muscles.

Exercise is really important - even if only upper body.
 
  • #14
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It helps. A lot.

IQ without methylphenidate HCl in bloodstream 151.
IQ with methylphenidate HCl in bloodsteam 184.

Let me reiterate. It helps a lot.

2 hours after taking it, I felt as though I had missed out on so much.
If you need it, get on it.
If you don't, don't.
 
  • #15
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It helps. A lot.

IQ without methylphenidate HCl in bloodstream 151.
IQ with methylphenidate HCl in bloodsteam 184.

Let me reiterate. It helps a lot.

2 hours after taking it, I felt as though I had missed out on so much.
If you need it, get on it.
If you don't, don't.

I have found that methylphenidate helps with short term spatial memory but is slightly detrimental to free-form association. There is an excellent article on this subject in scientific american. The effects of methylphenidate also vary greatly from individual to individual, and are not consistently predictable ( as well as diminishing over time with repeated use).
 
  • #16
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Ritalin is a good drug for ADHD, but we don't know much about its long term use and effects. It also can be used for depression, although there isn't much research into the effectiveness in that use.
 
  • #17
DaveC426913
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My son was diagnosed with ADD many years ago and was put on Ritalin. It had a dramatic (positive) effect on his ability to concentrate.

[D'OH! Fell for the ol' necroposting trick...]
 
  • #18
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Ritalin is a good drug for ADHD, but we don't know much about its long term use and effects. It also can be used for depression, although there isn't much research into the effectiveness in that use.

In my own personal experience, it is helpful as an adjunct for depression, but only in the short term (about a week). Dopamenergic circuits are subject to quite viscious feedback adjustment.
 
  • #19
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It also feels quite dangerous to take a stimulant medication for its mood changing properties. It seems like a quick path to addiction.
 
  • #20
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my children took it in H.S and it helped them focus and graduate. on your OCD problem, one of my children now 25 has this serious disorder which includes a syptom called Bain Lock {look it up} She is under treatment with a Psych MD and psychologist who specializes in this. Cognitive therapy is helpful but also therapy developed ny Japanese psychiatrist named Morita. It is a neurological brain disorder of communication pathway disruptions. There IS an antidepressant that also works on OCD -ask your MD Psych. Morita focused on diversion. When symptoms appear start doing something physical that you really HATE doing like cleaning the house and keep doing it focusing intensely on the cleaning- whatever it is that you HATE doing. It refocuses the brain off the OCD. Good luck.
 
  • #21
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Not to hijack the thread, but Morita was an interesting guy. At the risk of great oversimplification, I believe there is great value in the idea of "chopping wood/carrying water" as a means of therapy. As a psychiatric resident I often felt (and was chided for by supervisors) that many of my patients seemed excessively self-involved and that traditional psychoanalysis might actually worsen the condition, and even foster a dependence on the therapist. I felt vindicated after discovering David Reynolds and learning of Morita. I believe there is still much to be gained from this and similar approaches. For those with any interest in the Morita school, this seems to be a http://www.todoinstitute.org/morita.html" [Broken]
 
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  • #22
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Having watched my childrens' suffering, I am fairly sure that I had ADD as a kid. I also had/have small movement disorder Tourettes. There were no meds back in the 50's and 60's. Nothing helped until I discovered biofeedback and ZEN as an adult. Much truth to chopping wood/carrying water if one has ever spent time in a ZEN center. The ZEN experience has broken the ADD type 'monkey mind' problems. This is what Morita used in his approach. I am sure that it would benefit my children but they are in their 20's and hard to talk to. Consider at least biofeedback training.
 
  • #23
DaveC426913
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a symptom called Brain Lock {look it up}
I tried looking it up. All I found was a preponderance of references to a book with a 4-step program.

This is somewhat concerning because it makes me wonder if you've been handed a $ product rather than a legitimate clinical condition.

Can you list some non-commercial references to this symptom?
 
  • #24
RonL
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my children took it in H.S and it helped them focus and graduate. on your OCD problem, one of my children now 25 has this serious disorder which includes a syptom called Bain Lock {look it up} She is under treatment with a Psych MD and psychologist who specializes in this. Cognitive therapy is helpful but also therapy developed ny Japanese psychiatrist named Morita. It is a neurological brain disorder of communication pathway disruptions. There IS an antidepressant that also works on OCD -ask your MD Psych. Morita focused on diversion. When symptoms appear start doing something physical that you really HATE doing like cleaning the house and keep doing it focusing intensely on the cleaning- whatever it is that you HATE doing. It refocuses the brain off the OCD. Good luck.

I'm not sure I understand "when symptoms appear", every moment I'm awake my mind plays like a movie projector with no set program, anything I look at triggers thoughts that go in uncontrollable directions. The thing I hate most is doing paperwork, when I try to put books away and file papers, I will see something that changes my focus and that generally means more books come out and form a new stack.

I do take ritalin but only sometimes feel that things are being controlled.

Ron
 
  • #25
DaveC426913
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I'm not sure I understand "when symptoms appear", every moment I'm awake my mind plays like a movie projector with no set program, anything I look at triggers thoughts that go in uncontrollable directions. The thing I hate most is doing paperwork, when I try to put books away and file papers, I will see something that changes my focus and that generally means more books come out and form a new stack.

How interesting. I'm not sure I've ever heard anyone able to describe ADHD from the inside. I'm not sure even my son has been able to describe it (at least, not in the last 15 years or so).
 

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