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Advanced Quantum Mechanics?

  1. Dec 3, 2006 #1

    eep

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    Hi,
    I'm getting to the end of my final undergraduate course on quantum mechanics, which basically covered time dependent/independent perturbation theory and the fine structure of atoms. As I still have some time until graduate school, I'd like to continue studying quantum mechanics on my own and I'm not quite sure what's next. I'm guessing quantum field theory or relativistic quantum mechanics is the "next step" and I was wondering what textbooks would be recommended for self-study. The graduate courses use Sakurai's Modern Quantum Mechanics for the first semester, which seems to be the same material covered in my undergrad courses, but probably at a more advanced level, and then Merzbacher's Quantum Mechanics and some other books for reference for the second semester, which looks like it covers creation/annihilation operators and relativistic quantum mechanics.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 3, 2006 #2
    What textbook did you use? Why not cover the stuff (I'm guessing is) in the rest of the book, like scattering theory. You need to know stuff like cross-section for QFT.
     
  4. Dec 4, 2006 #3

    eep

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    Well we're finishing up the semester with scattering theory and superconductivity. We used a combination of Griffiths, and Bransden and Joachain's Quantum Mechanics. B&J seems to cover some of the topics I mentioned - maybe I'll just work through that.
     
  5. Dec 5, 2006 #4
  6. Dec 5, 2006 #5

    marcusl

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    Merzbacher is a standard, well-respected text, but I never found it easy to learn from. I much preferred G. Baym, Lectures on QM, for readability and for a nice way of presenting concepts. Schiff is another standard text, some complain it's too mathematical but the sections I've read have been clear and readable. Maybe it's because I've used it as a supplement rather than primary text. All three will take you through grad level QM.
     
  7. Dec 5, 2006 #6
  8. Jan 14, 2007 #7
    by the way, there is a book "Advanced Quantum Mechanics" from Sakurai (not Modern QM). does anyone has experience with it?
     
  9. Feb 12, 2007 #8
    Dont get Mandl !!!! Terrible

    Is Griffiths good?
     
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