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After academia

  1. Aug 17, 2011 #1

    MathematicalPhysicist

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    I am a little bit thinking of after graduating from msc and maybe even phd, what kind of jobs which aren't too intense are out there for people who want to continue learning theoretical physics and pure math?
    I mean work that leaves you with enough spare time to keep learning maths and physics.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 17, 2011 #2

    fss

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    Unemployment leaves you a lot of time to keep learning maths and physics. Being a professor forces you to.
     
  4. Aug 18, 2011 #3

    MathematicalPhysicist

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    So the answer is no, there aren't.

    Can't say I am surprised.

    OK, so umeployment or professorship here I come... :-)
     
  5. Aug 18, 2011 #4
    Consultancy, banking, politics? Some physicists & mathematicians in my country end up as programmers/"IT guys" for banks or small businesses. Then again my country is in the sh*tter, so your chances may be a lot better.
     
  6. Aug 18, 2011 #5

    fss

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    Your question is a poorly phrased one, with such ambiguous terms such as "enough," "too intense", and "learning." Depending on your definition of all three, pretty much any job fits your description. I don't really know how you expect people to give you a meaningful answer. You can make enough time for anything if you choose to.
     
  7. Aug 18, 2011 #6
    I've been self-studying math/physics for over 10 years now. One thing is that you need to adjust your time frame and expectations. In school, you're talking multiple classes at the same time, and focussed full time on your studies. But you're only in school for a few years. Even with PhD, its ~10 years total in school.

    Outside of academia, even if you only manage 1 hour/day in your studies, you have the rest of your life. Say conservatively 40 years. 1 hour/day for 40 years will accomplish a whole lot of self-study.
     
  8. Aug 20, 2011 #7

    MathematicalPhysicist

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    You correct, I was a little bit hasty on the submit button.

    Anyway, to rephrase my question, how do you find time to keep learning maths and physics beyond your daily work which is outside academia, and does you learning of this material is meaningful to you, as in not just a cursory knowledge?

    Thanks, and sorry for the ambiguous OP.
     
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