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Age/Location Correlates to Political Inclination?

  1. Jul 14, 2004 #1

    loseyourname

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    I'm trying to see if there is any correlation (on this forum, not in general) between geographic location - for US members only - and political leaning. It seems that posters from the south and midwest are predominantly right-leaning republicans, whereas posters from the northeast and from California are predominantly left-wing democrats. Then again, there seems to be an even stronger correlation between age and political inclination. So if you can, just post your age, location (US only please), and political affiliation (if any) along with the way you usually lean. I have no idea if this thread will be of any real use, but I'm curious nonetheless.

    I'll start. I'm 23 years old and live in southern California. I am registered as a non-partisan and tend to lean rightward with respect to economic and social welfare issues. I lean leftward primarily with respect to civil liberties and freedom-of-expression issues, and with religious issues.
     
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  3. Jul 14, 2004 #2
    I'm in a demcrat stronghold and am 21. I am an anomaly I guess, as my politics fall center-right.

    Well, let's start to clarify since it has been , correctly, stated that liberal, left, right, conservative have all kinds of meanings.


    I typically vote republican, but never a straight ticket. Never will either.

    Issues:

    Pro Choice, but not anti abortion except late term (with the minute exception of the woman's life being in danger). Basically, I prefer people to look to adoption, but don't support a law stopping someone from an abortion in the first two trimesters.

    Against gay marriage, for civil unions. Would be happy with an amendment protecting the states right to choose what they wish to honor.

    Against Socialized healthcare, for subsidizing of private entities based on economic need of patient.

    For gun control via better registration and closed loopholes, against gun control via outlawing guns based on looks (woohoo to the assault weapons ban)

    For tort reform in various forms across the board.

    For the signing of a revamped kyoto agreement (ie, one that includes China and other 'developing nations')

    The list goes on, but here's a beginning.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2004
  4. Jul 14, 2004 #3
    Proud, 19-year-old liberal (Dems are too far right on most issues, IMO) who lives in Florida.
     
  5. Jul 14, 2004 #4

    selfAdjoint

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    70 year old "Scoop Jackson Democrat" (i.e. pro military) in Wisconsin, do-gooder heaven.
     
  6. Jul 15, 2004 #5

    Gokul43201

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    26 years old, mostly liberal,Ohio - predicted Battleground state for '04, though consistently Republican for the last few.
     
  7. Jul 15, 2004 #6
    Western Maryland, Liberal, Democrat (you have to work within the two party system these days if you want to get anywhere)
     
  8. Jul 15, 2004 #7
    16 year old liberal from a rich suburb of New York City.
     
  9. Jul 15, 2004 #8

    russ_watters

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    I am a 28 year old moderate republican. Trouble is, I have views on the far right and far left. Pro choice, pro gun control, pro military, pro strong foreign policy, anti socialism. Reconcile that...
     
  10. Jul 16, 2004 #9
    Is being anti-socialist considered far right?
     
  11. Jul 16, 2004 #10

    GENIERE

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    Retired NJ boy, but have lived in several states and a half year in Germany as my company moved me around. I was extremely liberal when young, even thought communism might work, and voted for JFK and Johnson. JFK was OK but the Johnson experience was enough to convert me. I’ve voted for republicans ever since, growing more conservative by the year. I enjoy collecting social security, most of which is going to a trust fund for the grandkids. I berlieve all politicians holding national office should be conservative. I can abide with moderate Democrats at the state level and could vote for a liberal at the municipal level.
     
  12. Jul 16, 2004 #11
    If so, I may have to reconsider my descriptin of center-right
     
  13. Jul 16, 2004 #12

    Njorl

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    I'm 41 and live in the Maryland suburbs of DC. Compared to people who don't post on the net a lot, I'm a liberal Democrat. Compared to people who do post on the net a lot, I'm just a Democrat. I am most liberal on civil rights issues, just left of center on economic issues.

    When someone figures out what conservative and liberal foreign policies are, please tell me. Isolationism and interventionism seem to both be conservative and liberal. Prevailing opinion is that unilateralism is conservative, and multilateralism is liberal. I don't believe it though. Free trade is both liberal and conservative, as is protectionism.

    Njorl
     
  14. Jul 16, 2004 #13

    selfAdjoint

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    I track all those opinions except the anti-socialism. I can't stand most marxists, but some of their ideas aren't totally dumb.

    On guns my philosphy has two points:
    1. Tighten the registration laws, close the gun show loop hole, national gun id database.
    2. Concealed carry, no fee nor license, in every state.

    This comes from a literal interpretation of the second amendment. First point is the "well regulated militia", second point is "right to keep and bear arms".
     
  15. Jul 16, 2004 #14

    russ_watters

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    Anti socialism - as in welfare, public housing, social security, medicare, universal healthcare, etc. Yeah, thats right wing.
     
  16. Jul 16, 2004 #15
    I've gone back and edited my post to include some examples. I urge you all to do that so we can get a better outlook, rather than labels.
     
  17. Jul 16, 2004 #16

    Gokul43201

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    I think the Republicans get to claim free trade as theirs. The idea is very counter-socialist and relies on having minimal control by government.
     
  18. Jul 16, 2004 #17

    selfAdjoint

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    Clinton backed NAFTA, Bush laid on protectionist tariffs. You want to reconsider. And it's just a straw man to call anything Democrat "socialist". Clinton defied the New York marxoids, not only on NAFTA but also on welfare reform. He took a lot of flack from the pinks for both of those.
     
  19. Jul 17, 2004 #18
    Oh, don't get me started on NAFTA...and I am no "pink".
     
  20. Jul 19, 2004 #19
    I can't recall who said it, but there is probably some truth to the saying that "If you are not a socialist at 20 you have no heart, and if you are still a socialist at 40 you have no brain".

    There you go, guys. Anyone I haven't offended there? :redface:
     
  21. Jul 20, 2004 #20
    I know im not American but this point intrigues. Can u explain why please!!

    thanks for that! I happen to be in the 20 year old category though a lot of my family members still hold socialist beliefs and they're over 50! Think I need to show them this quote! :rofl:
     
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