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Algebra1 - Precalc

  1. Jun 15, 2013 #1
    Would these cover all I need to know, all the way up til Calculus (not including Calculus)?
    aka do they cover Algebra, Geometry, Algebra 2, Trigonometry, and Precalc -- leading me into Calculus?

    ---------------------------------------------------

    Algebra 1:
    Algebra, Gelfand

    Geometry:
    Euclid's Elements, Euclid (Green Lion Press edition)


    Algebra 2:
    Precalculus, Sullivan
    Functions and Graphs, Gelfand

    Trig:
    Trigonometry, Gelfand

    Extras (the rest of Gelfand's Correspondence):
    The Method of Coordinates
    Sequences, Combinations, Limits
    Lines and Curves: A Practical Geometry Handbook

    ---------------------------------------------------

    I want a challenge, but I don't want to miss/skip anything important. Thoughts?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 15, 2013 #2

    QuantumCurt

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  4. Jun 15, 2013 #3
    Yeah, the Jacobs one was the other one I was considering. I just thought I'd feel much more involved reading from Euclid, "The Father of Geometry" lol. Especially since the Amazon reviews for that book were basically the closest thing you can get to an orgasm in text-form.

    I'll look into that one (and the proof one) since it seems to be the most popular. Do you think everything else would cover all I need and should know to be ready for Calculus?

    Edit: "Coxeter’s Geometry Revisited" seems to get mentioned a lot too, would that pair good with Euclid/Jacob/Doug?
     
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2013
  5. Jun 16, 2013 #4

    QuantumCurt

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    I've heard that Euclids Elements is an excellent book. However, I don't think it's really the type of book that you would want to use for self-teaching, because I believe it's more of the theory behind geometry, rather than series of actual worked out examples. For self-teaching purposes, Euclids Elements probably wouldn't be the best choice. From what I've gathered though, it is a wonderful read, and would likely be a good supplement type book to get you more motivated to study geometry. I really need to read it myself.

    I imagine all of the other books will cover what you need to know, assuming that they're relatively comprehensive books. However, I don't have any experience with the Gelfand books. I used the Larson books for Algebra 1/2, College Algebra, and I'm currently using the Larson book for Trigonometry.

    Sometimes I love the Larson books, and sometimes I hate the Larson books. It really depends on the chapters. The Larson College Algebra book is quite good though as far as pre-calc algebra foundations go. The student solutions manual for it is kind of hit or miss though. Sometimes the solutions will be completely worked out, and other times it will show the original problem, and then the final answer with one intermediate step. Really? Were there any other steps between points A and point M?...lol

    So far, the Larson Trigonometry book seems pretty good, but I'm only about two chapters in so far.
     
  6. Jun 16, 2013 #5

    QuantumCurt

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    Here's a link to a bunch of free ebooks that you might want to check out. They're all downloadable pdf's, and they've got everything from Algebra I/II, Geometry, Trigonometry, College Algebra/Pre-Calc, and I believe maybe even some introductory calculus.

    http://www.scribd.com/collections/4275493/Math-eText-Collection
     
  7. Jun 16, 2013 #6
    I see, makes sense too. I will do the Harold Jacobs one then, and maybe pair it with Euclid's for the fun of it. Hopefully someone who has used these other books responds otherwise I'll definitely check out the Larson books.

    edit: Ha, I discovered Scribd today in which I payed for the month so I can get a Gelfand book. Thanks for that link!
     
  8. Jun 16, 2013 #7

    QuantumCurt

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    Some of the Larson books seem to fall a little short on examples within the chapters. The College Algebra book was excellent in my opinion, but Algebra I and II could have been better. The College Algebra book has a great structure though. Some of the end of section exercises are very challenging, plus it has sections devoted to proofs of some of the theorems that are used heavily, as well as sections of critical thinking/problem solving type problems in each chapter that can be fairly abstract.

    It's not a cheap book, but you can get it used for next to nothing. https://www.amazon.com/College-Alge...359740&sr=8-1&keywords=larson+college+algebra
     
  9. Jun 16, 2013 #8
    I think your list looks pretty good. For geometry, Kiselev's two books are really fantastic. As well, you might like to check out the Art of Problem Solving books.

    EDIT: You should read Coxeter after reading something like Jacobs, Kiselev, AoPS, etc.
     
  10. Jun 16, 2013 #9
    Ahh, thanks for the input on Coxeter. I'll check out Kiselev, pretty torn on Geometry now lol.
     
  11. Jun 16, 2013 #10
    Personally, I would recommend Kiselev or AoPS... I think Jacob's is too elementary/slow moving. You can get both Kiselev books from the publisher right now for $45. AoPS is fantastic if you want to prep for math competitions. All of their books are great.
     
  12. Jun 16, 2013 #11
    Hmm, yeah that was one of the reasons I didn't mention Jacobs in my first post. Just didn't seem to flow well with the others. I'll give Kiselev a look.

    On another note: I'm home alone, it's literally minutes from midnight and I swear I hear a baby crying in my living room right now as I'm typing this. I'm really hoping someone left the TV on..
     
  13. Jun 16, 2013 #12

    QuantumCurt

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    Sorry, I must have left my baby in your house earlier. I'll be back for it in the morning. ;)


    AoPS is great too. The books are great, and it's a great website as well. Lots of competition style math and whatnot. http://www.artofproblemsolving.com/
     
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