Alternating current wave prob

  • Thread starter Rasine
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  • #1
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alternating current wave prob......

assume the wave is sinusoidal. suppose that each horizontal division (13) represents 1.0 ns and that each vertical division (11) represents 1 mV. what is the approx. rms voltage?

please help me solve this.

i am not so sure how to find rms, and if you do please explain it.

thank you.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
ZapperZ
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Rasine said:
assume the wave is sinusoidal. suppose that each horizontal division (13) represents 1.0 ns and that each vertical division (11) represents 1 mV. what is the approx. rms voltage?

please help me solve this.

i am not so sure how to find rms, and if you do please explain it.

thank you.
http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/electric/acres.html#c2

Look at the example for RMS current.

Zz.
 
  • #3
berkeman
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Rasine said:
assume the wave is sinusoidal. suppose that each horizontal division (13) represents 1.0 ns and that each vertical division (11) represents 1 mV. what is the approx. rms voltage?

please help me solve this.

i am not so sure how to find rms, and if you do please explain it.

thank you.
Were you trying to post some waveform? 11/13/etc. Whatever. If you want the RMS, just use the Vpp measurement to get you there. Vp= sqrt(2)*Vrms, Vpp = 2*sqrt(2)(Vrms)


EDIT -- If you want a more complete explanation of RMS versus Vpp, we can oblige.
 
  • #4
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what is the Vp measurement? and how does it related to rms?
 

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