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Am I setting this up properly?

  1. Oct 15, 2008 #1
    Can I assume I3 = 2A since the ammeter is in series between d and c?

    Also, what do I do with V in the linear equations?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 16, 2008 #2

    Defennder

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    Your KVL loop equations look ok. You're supposed to find V. You have sufficient info in your equations to solve for it.
     
  4. Oct 16, 2008 #3
    Well, I just used the top two equations in a matrix to find I1 and I2.

    I1 + I2 = 2
    7I1 + 0I2 = 5

    I1= .714286
    I2= 1.28571

    With this, I can set V = sum of the rest of the voltage drops, correct?
     
  5. Oct 16, 2008 #4

    Defennder

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    I didn't check your calculations, but your approach is correct.
     
  6. Oct 16, 2008 #5
    i1r1 - v1 + i3r2 - i2r3 = -v ??
     
  7. Oct 16, 2008 #6

    Defennder

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    Sorry I missed that last line of your previous post. What do you mean by "sum of the rest of the voltage drops" ?
     
  8. Oct 16, 2008 #7
    The voltage difference from V to V should be zero.

    i1r1 - v1 + i3r2 - i2r3 = -v ??
     
  9. Oct 17, 2008 #8

    Defennder

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    How did you get that? Your equation has to be a loop KVL equation, and it looks like there isn't any loop which contains all three currents which your current equation has. But why do you need to do that? Once you've found I2 and I3 from above, just use of the original equations to get V.
     
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