News American justice tries insanity (1 Viewer)

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A diagnostically insane person commits what might otherwise be considered a capital crime. Often in our country, however, he is forced to take medicine after the fact in an attempt to make him legally sane, so he can face execution. How can American courts justify this action, and how can a doctor participate with it?
 
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No, if you were legally insane when you did the crime, you can't be put to death after you are 'healed'.

You always ask some odd questions, like heartless. :smile:
 
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http://pn.psychiatryonline.org/cgi/content/full/36/7/18" [Broken]
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http://www.nyadp.org/main/Advocate405.html" [Broken]

http://www.nami.org/Content/ContentGroups/Press_Room1/2006/Press_Releases_January2006/Amnesty_Internationals_Report_on_the_Death_Penalty_and_Serious_Mental_Illness.htm" [Broken]

In supreme irony, defendants denied medical treatment before committing crimes may be forcibly medicated to make them competent to stand trial or be executed. States make people who are profoundly sick - through no fault of their own - marginally well for the sole purpose of putting them to death.
Just Google with the search terms "death penalty," "mental illness" and "forcibly medicated" together.
 
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Curious3141

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If that's true then it makes no sense at all. Mens rea at the time of commission should be what matters.

Then again, if you disbelieve in free will, the whole question becomes moot, even for a "sane" person.
 

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