American Muslim scholars condemn terrorism

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  • #26
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russ_watters said:
.......
The point - and the solution - is that there is a serious cultural problem in such countries that needs to be fixed. People talk about the US having a violent culture (with all our gun crime...) - that's a problem. The problem in many middle-eastern countries is much, much worse.
......
I think different cultures give people different views about each other, not the problems brought about before each other, so there is or should be no "serious cultural problem", in my opinion, as what you say. Conflicts, as serious as terrorism people are discussing, I think are originally due to individuals' internal conflicts and get developed over time among communities, not mainly by cultural viewpoints that a certain population or community have about others. Inspite of that, I still, in my mind, have the idea that the US is violent in some of its part, especially in political issues....
 
  • #27
russ_watters said:
No, what I find missing is condemnations of terrorism from non-terrorist Muslims who live in the middle-east. Where are the anti al Qaeda protests in Saudia Arabia? Where are the anti Hamas protests in Syria?

What I find missing is condemnation of terrorism from people whom the terrorists are supposedly fighting for: the people of the middle east.
I couldn't agree more.
 
  • #28
The_Professional said:
I couldn't agree more.
Just a short question.

If you knew one of your neigbours was a terrorist but you didn't quite know which one, would you stand on your doorstep and shout to the world that you didn't agree with him?

Think before you answer because your wife and children are standing behind you.

Why are you so free to endanger the lives of people you don't know and condemn them when THEY are the true victims of the terror you rant about?

Yeah, you can sit there on your respective 'porches' knowing that the good ole' USofA is there fighting for you.

Would you be so free with your opinions in a mosque in Kabul?

Try putting oneself in the shoes of another before condemning the other.
 
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  • #29
The Smoking Man said:
Try thinking before you beat your rather emaciated chest backed by the intellect of a gnat.
You're able to string together a couple of english words Mr. Intellectual. You should be proud. The junior g-man badge award is in the mail
 
  • #30
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Bang on Smoking Man! Perhaps a little to close to home for some people
 
  • #31
Archon
The_Professional said:
You're able to string together a couple of english words Mr. Intellectual. You should be proud. The junior g-man badge award is in the mail
Rather you should say that he can string a point together. I have yet to see the same from you in this thread. Now, are you going to respond to his question (a valid one), or are you going to continue with only insults?
 
  • #32
Archon said:
Rather you should say that he can string a point together. I have yet to see the same from you in this thread. Now, are you going to respond to his question (a valid one), or are you going to continue with only insults?
Did you read the original post I quoted. I see reading comprehension is not one of your strongest points.
Since when did a personal attack became a valid point.

And, I don't have to answer his question which was summed up into an ad hominem.
 
  • #33
Archon
The_Professional said:
Did you read the original post I quoted. I see reading comprehension is not one of your strongest points.
Since when did a personal attack became a valid point.

And, I don't have to answer his question which was summed up into an ad hominem.
My point is that although his post did contain a personal attack, it also contained a valid question and a good point. Your post contained nothing but a reaction to his personal attack: no point, no response, nothing of substance. Why not just ignore the insult and answer the question?

Reading Comprehension: Math is my strongest point, but reading comprehension isn't that far behind. But since I only have one "strongest point," I must say that you are correct.
 
  • #34
Hahahaa...and this is what I get for staying out of trouble.

I don't care about your point
 
  • #35
Archon
The_Professional said:
Hahahaa...and this is what I get for staying out of trouble.

I don't care about your point
Fair enough. It is The Smoking Man's point, not mine, that is really important. As long as you care about his point, I'm satisfied.
 
  • #36
The_Professional said:
Did you read the original post I quoted. I see reading comprehension is not one of your strongest points.
Since when did a personal attack became a valid point.

And, I don't have to answer his question which was summed up into an ad hominem.
Well, I see some people have been teaching you big words and giving you a lukewarm understanding of what they actually mean.

An unjustified personal attack is what you mean.

In this case, the attack was justified.

If, for example you came out and supported terroism, calling you a terrorist supporter would not be a personal attack but a statement of fact, would it not?

What you did was to launch an attack on people without thought to their position and demanding that they perform an action based on your personal experience.

You failed to make even the most basic of imperical observations and not that not only do they make statements with their actions every day of their lives but they give their lives with these statements.

You talk of people as though they agree with what is going on in their country and refuse to call them innocents or riteous even when they die. Yes, all those people who die in those line-ups to sign up for the Iraqi Military or the local police force are making a very big statement.

You insult their memories and those of the innumerable more who are wounded in the attempt.

You expect mosques and Imam to make statements to the general population and risk their own lives and the lives of their adherents by identifying themselves as what the terrorists in turn identify as collaberators. You in effect, want them to make statements of principle to appease YOU and risk the lives of their wives and children to satisfy your basic need to dominate them.

Now pardon me for making a judgement of your character but, as I have said before, I have relatives who are Moslem.

I see your assessment of their situation as self serving and to display a total lack of respect and decency.

Remember, the bulk of the followers of Islam in this world and specifically in Iraq are NOT terrorists or fundamentalists. Because they choose not to speak out becasue of fear for their lives should not be taken as an act of complicity and certainly should not become a point of callous judgement by people like yourself who have never lived in terror.

Does that clarify the position?
 
  • #37
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polls show there is a high fraction of people in several countries that actually support terrorism
Including the States... Lets not forget about the IRA, where did they get a lot of there funding from
 
  • #38
The Smoking Man said:
Well, I see some people have been teaching you big words and giving you a lukewarm understanding of what they actually mean.

An unjustified personal attack is what you mean.
You're a pompous jerkoff. I'm surprise you lasted this long

It's nice that you felt the need to flex your "intellectual" prowess because a person disagreed with your "ideas". Do you feel better now?
 
  • #39
The_Professional said:
You're a pompous jerkoff. I'm surprise you lasted this long

It's nice that you felt the need to flex your "intellectual" prowess because a person disagreed with your "ideas". Do you feel better now?
I think Archon has a good point here. The Smoking Man may have been condescending in making his point, and a valid one at that, but responding out of nothing but spite makes you the bigger ass.

Plenty of people, including jews, were considered complicit to the Nazis during WWII because they did what they needed to to keep from being killed or thrown in a prison camp(where they'd likely die). It's easy for people like us to be idealists and say that it's better to stand up against these people than to cower from them. The reality though is that it's not so easy and teh majority of people don't. It would be great for there to be a person daring enough, and perhaps crazy enough, to stand up against these organizations right in their own backyard but you can't denounce them because no such person exists.

So what is your opinion in regard to this point? If you don't have one or one isn't forthcoming then please don't bother responding.
 
  • #40
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The_Professional said:
You're a pompous jerkoff. I'm surprise you lasted this long

It's nice that you felt the need to flex your "intellectual" prowess because a person disagreed with your "ideas". Do you feel better now?
All but one of your posts in this thread has been an insult towards someone, and that 1 contained exactly 0 usefull information.
 
  • #41
EnumaElish
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russ_watters said:
What I'm more interested in seeing is people in muslim countries denouncing terrorism, in the same way that a KKK rally in the US gets ten times as many people marching against it than for it.
There are such examples. See http://www.keepmedia.com/pubs/AFP/2003/11/21/353151 [Broken].
 
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  • #42
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I question why Russ want's to see Muslims denounce terror. I for one have yet to see a single anti-terrorism rally anywhere in Canada and most of Europe. Why are you assuming they're against it but needing proof for Muslims?
 

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