Americans are all raccoons!

  • Thread starter Rach3
  • Start date
  • #26
I agree with Rach3! Every apple(/fruit/vegetable) is a 'clone' of the other. They're nothing but good looking....

I was sick recently and thought I'd try apples to aid in my recovery and I discovered Honey Crisp apples. They are rather large, have a very crisp flesh, and are deliciously sweet. Yes, they are around $3.00/lb but worth it. I loath Red Delicious apples except for baking. They are small and grainy and suck as only small, grainy apples can.
 
  • #27
Rach3
Yes, they are around $3.00/lb but worth it.

That's nothing! The apples they have in Japan are typically $2 USD per apple, as big as oversize grapefruits, and more flavorful than all other fruits in the world put together. They're sold individually wrapped in white nets. (It's funny how over-wrapped things are in Japan, like the individually shrink-wrapped bananas. :confused:)
 
  • #28
355
1
My favorite are Gala apples, but they are pretty expensive to.
 
  • #29
61
2
Those are quite cheap over here and are delicious!!
 
  • #30
Integral
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
7,212
56
I was sick recently and thought I'd try apples to aid in my recovery and I discovered Honey Crisp apples. They are rather large, have a very crisp flesh, and are deliciously sweet. Yes, they are around $3.00/lb but worth it. I loath Red Delicious apples except for baking. They are small and grainy and suck as only small, grainy apples can.

A Red Or Golden Delicious Apple picked off the tree is pretty good, sweet and crunchy. They begin to degrade the instant they are picked, within a few days they are nearly in-edible, turning into apple sauce in a tough skin.
 
  • #31
Moonbear
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
11,558
53
A Red Or Golden Delicious Apple picked off the tree is pretty good, sweet and crunchy. They begin to degrade the instant they are picked, within a few days they are nearly in-edible, turning into apple sauce in a tough skin.

I agree. My grandfather used to have apple trees...red delicious, golden delicious, and macintosh. Freshly picked, they're just wonderful!
 
  • #32
turbo
Gold Member
3,147
53
My favorite are Gala apples, but they are pretty expensive to.
Years ago, I was on a business trip to Ticonderoga and after crossing into NY at Crown Point and heading south, I saw an orchard with a roadside store. I stopped in and asked the young lady there what was the best-tasting apple they had. She handed me a Gala, I bit into it, and bought a peck of them. They're still my favorites, but only in season. They don't hold their character long after harvest. For that, I'll take Black Oxford any day. Pick them after a frost, and eat them all winter. They are a wonderful cold-climate variety, and if you look up FedCo Seeds on the Internet, you'll see that they are actively promoting this legacy variety. You can buy seedlings from them - grown here in Maine by organic growers.
 
  • #33
161
0
Apples rock, yes that includes me. :D
 
  • #34
jim mcnamara
Mentor
4,478
3,256
Try living a lifetime with people who think that salt is a food group.

Growing up I never used salt on anything. I'm forced to do all of the cooking or skip meals prepared by my salt-freaked family members. The American diet doesn't live only at McDonalds. Me and my edematous feet search for salt relief a sea of haline cuisine.
 
  • #35
Moonbear
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
11,558
53
For that, I'll take Black Oxford any day. Pick them after a frost, and eat them all winter. They are a wonderful cold-climate variety, and if you look up FedCo Seeds on the Internet, you'll see that they are actively promoting this legacy variety. You can buy seedlings from them - grown here in Maine by organic growers.

I've never heard of that variety before. Are they local to Maine? I'll keep an eye out, because I'd like to find some varieties that store well.
 
  • #36
Evo
Mentor
23,539
3,175
Try living a lifetime with people who think that salt is a food group.

Growing up I never used salt on anything. I'm forced to do all of the cooking or skip meals prepared by my salt-freaked family members. The American diet doesn't live only at McDonalds. Me and my edematous feet search for salt relief a sea of haline cuisine.
Hmmmpf, I am one of those people that like a little food with my salt.

Yes, it will kill me someday, I'm sure, but I've tried life without salt and it's not worth living. The day I have to give up salt and spices, including fresh hot peppers, is the day life has no meaning. :frown:
 
  • #37
turbo
Gold Member
3,147
53
I've never heard of that variety before. Are they local to Maine? I'll keep an eye out, because I'd like to find some varieties that store well.
Yes, Black Oxford is a variety that was first identified in Oxford County in Maine (either in the towns of Paris or South Paris, IIR). They have a deep purplish-brown skin and yellow flesh and they are delicious. They are very firm, crisp apples and should be harvested late in the season. They will keep all winter if you have a cool place to store them. My wife and I rented a farm for a couple of years, and there was a Black Oxford tree next to the house. They are not a variety that you would eat before they're fully ripe, like Macs, because they are very hard until they ripen off. Buy a tree for $19.00 and enjoy. I have apple trees on my property, and and going to add a Black Oxford.

http://www.fedcoseeds.com/trees/TreesOrderItem.php?id=77&TreeName= [Broken]
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #38
turbo
Gold Member
3,147
53
Yes, it will kill me someday, I'm sure, but I've tried life without salt and it's not worth living. The day I have to give up salt and spices, including fresh hot peppers, is the day life has no meaning. :frown:
Ditto! I am nuking a bowl of (slightly) salty Spanish rice left over from last night's supper, and it is seasoned with our fresh-frozen jalapenos and some of our canned habanero sauce (just chopped peppers and garlic packed in water and vinegar). I gave a little jar of that to our neighbor who gave us the fresh garlic that we made the sauce with. His crew had a "Subway night" at work, so he took what was left of the habanero sauce with him, put some on his sandwich and offered the rest around. One guy that brags about eating hot sauces put a couple of teaspoons of the sauce in his sandwich. Allen said that the guy didn't say anything as he started eating, but after a couple of bites, sweat was running from his temples and he headed for the water cooler. People that think Tabasco is real hot just haven't been properly educated. :surprised :tongue2:
 
  • #39
Astronuc
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
19,964
3,498
I like seasoned or savory food, but I minimize, even exclude, salt in my cooking. Since I don't use salt, it is very apparent when I taste restaurant food where salt is used.

I certainly enjoy spicy (picante) foods like hot curries and hot pepper sauces - but salt is not necessarily part of it.
 
  • #40
1,031
18
In America, you can't get a tasty tomato unless you grow it yourself (or have a neighbor who does). How about where you come from?
 
  • #41
turbo
Gold Member
3,147
53
In America, you can't get a tasty tomato unless you grow it yourself (or have a neighbor who does). How about where you come from?
You're right. Tomatoes in US supermarkets generally suck. I haven't eaten a fresh tomato since the hard frost killed our garden. A new 24-acre greenhouse just started production about 5 miles from here - their plan is to ship vine-ripened tomatoes directly to supermarkets and restaurants all over northern New England. They'll be expensive, but should be several notches better than the "vine tomatoes" that are picked immature and gassed to make them appear ripe, and WAY better than the cardboard-tasting Hypack varieties.
 
  • #42
1,167
9
I too, already miss my tomatos. I did find a little store in Ann Arbor that sells "maters". So named to avoid the tomato growers union regs on tomatos, they are mis-shapen, wolderful, tastie, juicy tomatos, flown up from Fla, right off the vine.
 
  • #43
berkeman
Mentor
60,904
11,291
I agree. My grandfather used to have apple trees...red delicious, golden delicious, and macintosh. Freshly picked, they're just wonderful!

That's funny. Looks like Moonbear's kitty is taking a bead on a bluejay in an apple tree.... :devil:
 
  • #44
jim mcnamara
Mentor
4,478
3,256
... People that think Tabasco is real hot just haven't been properly educated. :surprised :tongue2:

Wrong. They haven't lived in New Mexico. My kids ate green Santo Domingo chiles fried in bacon fat. That's about 12000 Scoville units (SHUs). Tobasco rates 2500-5000.

Bought a tamale from a tamalena, then she gave me hot sauce - said "You can't taste this without some help...". Whoa, I could taste it alright.
 
  • #45
turbo
Gold Member
3,147
53
Wrong. They haven't lived in New Mexico. My kids ate green Santo Domingo chiles fried in bacon fat. That's about 12000 Scoville units (SHUs). Tobasco rates 2500-5000.

Bought a tamale from a tamalena, then she gave me hot sauce - said "You can't taste this without some help...". Whoa, I could taste it alright.
Well, habaneros range from 200,000 to 300,00 Scoville units, and our red Caribbeans are high on that scale. Although we grow them to process into sauces, etc to cook with, we also use those peppers "neat" in certain foods, like sauteed meat and vegetable fillings to use in wraps. I like the heat, and though the hot taste is great when you're used to them, they will make your scalp sweat, and that's not something you can control. If you feel a cold coming on, put some habanero sauce in your soup, sandwich, whatever, and ride it out. Great stuff. We eat our jalapenos split lengthwise with all the placenta and seeds left in, stuffed with cream cheese and topped with Monterey jack, cooked on the grill on a pizza pan. It doesn't matter how many I make (within reason) - there are no left-overs. Tabasco is not much hotter than our home-made tomato salsas, and we use those on eggs, omelets, meat, casseroles, sandwiches, etc.
 
Last edited:
  • #47
223
0
In CA there are shops called Trader Joes, only place I have every bought food in America, they have decent produce, at a *fair* price
 
  • #48
I was raised Catholic... in a large Catholic family. Therefore am still plagued with guilt if I leave food on my plate. so yeah. I eat everything and am proud of it. :rofl:

But while I'll eat anything, I definitely have preferences. :biggrin:
 
  • #49
McGyver
Well - it appears I am mostly unaffected by THESE food issues as I've been so broke this year I rarely get to eat out. Might I propose that more Americans adopt my practice of "rationing" to avoid these food pitfalls. It might slow down the economy and GDP a bit, but right now would not affect me.
 
  • #50
Skyhunter
I like seasoned or savory food, but I minimize, even exclude, salt in my cooking. Since I don't use salt, it is very apparent when I taste restaurant food where salt is used.

I certainly enjoy spicy (picante) foods like hot curries and hot pepper sauces - but salt is not necessarily part of it.

I make a mexican mole' sauce that I bet you would enjoy. I used dried chinese red peppers to give it some heat.
 

Related Threads on Americans are all raccoons!

  • Last Post
4
Replies
83
Views
11K
  • Last Post
3
Replies
70
Views
7K
  • Last Post
2
Replies
39
Views
3K
Replies
97
Views
12K
Z
  • Last Post
Replies
15
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
22
Views
4K
Replies
56
Views
6K
Replies
44
Views
10K
Replies
13
Views
2K
Replies
20
Views
3K
Top