Americans are all raccoons!

  • Thread starter Rach3
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  • #76
Rach3
I've never been fond of wax fruits or vegetables, my mother always kept a bowl of wax fruit on the coffee table. :frown:
A couple of weeks ago, there was a sampler plate of crackers in a store. I tried one, it was really tough and gummy, slightly metallic, I keeped trying to bite through it - no use. Closer inspection, it's not free samples, it's a plastic display.
 
  • #77
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A couple of weeks ago, there was a sampler plate of crackers in a store. I tried one, it was really tough and gummy, slightly metallic, I keeped trying to bite through it - no use. Closer inspection, it's not free samples, it's a plastic display.
Good Lord, Rach, no wonder you complain about American cuisine!
:rofl:
 
  • #78
Rach3
Good Lord, Rach, no wonder you complain about American cuisine!
:rofl:
Eh, it was in Tokyo. :uhh:
 
  • #79
Rach3
I actually think this hoarding behavior is more a symptom of age-related neural problems. We attribute it to those who survived the depression or holocaust mainly because they are the people who are a large part of the elderly population right now. I've seen this across quite a spectrum of elderly though. What's impressive is that in most cases I've seen, they are incredibly organized about it. Stacks and stacks of saved newspapers in one corner, shelves of canned food they bought on sale (even if it's long outdated) all together, organized by type and brand, grocery bags all piled up together in another place, plastic food containers stacked up in another...and sometimes you see it with animal hoarding too...the elderly person who has 20 or 30 cats that have overrun their house, but they keep taking in more. It goes far beyond canning vegetables for winter or saving re-usable things.
Aren't you maybe generalizing a bit? Most elderly geezers I know don't have these hoarding habits, even the more senile ones. I thought this behavior was psychiatric in nature, and started closer to middle age.
 
  • #80
Moonbear
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Aren't you maybe generalizing a bit? Most elderly geezers I know don't have these hoarding habits, even the more senile ones. I thought this behavior was psychiatric in nature, and started closer to middle age.
Did I say ALL senior citizens do this? I referred to a neural problem...hence, psychiatric, yes. :rolleyes: I was just saying that when you see this, it's not likely just related to having survived the holocaust or depression as a child.
 
  • #81
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I actually think this hoarding behavior is more a symptom of age-related neural problems. We attribute it to those who survived the depression or holocaust mainly because they are the people who are a large part of the elderly population right now. I've seen this across quite a spectrum of elderly though. What's impressive is that in most cases I've seen, they are incredibly organized about it. Stacks and stacks of saved newspapers in one corner, shelves of canned food they bought on sale (even if it's long outdated) all together, organized by type and brand, grocery bags all piled up together in another place, plastic food containers stacked up in another...and sometimes you see it with animal hoarding too...the elderly person who has 20 or 30 cats that have overrun their house, but they keep taking in more. It goes far beyond canning vegetables for winter or saving re-usable things.
http://www.la4seniors.com/hoarding.htm" [Broken] is compulsive behaviour, a symptom of anxiety disorders. It has many causes, including stressful life events.
 
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