Americans are fat?

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  • #76
jimmy p
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I dont see the deal with keeping weight down. It may just be my fantastic teenage high metabolism, but I work about 12 hour days (9.15-21.45) approx. and every day I eat something unhealthy (chips and sausage) because that is just accross the road from work. And the end of my long day, I have a couple of pints at the local pub and then a kebab from the takeaway. The most exercise I get is the 10 minute walk to and from work. I am 5'10" (about 178cm) and weigh about 70-75kg. Easy peasy.
 
  • #77
Monique
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Moonbear said:
I used to live in Michigan, and it's like many parts of the midwest, there does seem to be a much higher proportion of overweight people there, and a noticeably higher proportion of obese people. I think it has a lot to do with the selections in the grocery stores there. When living there, I found it next to impossible to find decent food in the grocery stores. Things I considered perfectly ordinary foods could only be found in the expensive health food stores! I had no problem staying thin because I just couldn't find food I was willing to eat.
You mean, not all of the US is like that? :big relief: the only two sections you'd ever find me in was the produce and meat, well actually.. just the meat and milk/juice section.. I had to drive like 15 miles to find a store where they actually sold fresh produce, and I was living in the middle of an urban area :eek: actually, that store was on the infamous '8 mile road' in Detroit :rolleyes:

I just couldn't stomach all the other products they were selling in the aisles, and everything is soooo sweet :yuck: I actually imported all my cheese and candy and cookies and stuff :biggrin: Moonbear, if you like good cheese try to get some aged 'Old Amsterdam', it's a little pricey but oh, very yummy!! :approve:

After a while I started discovering all the Russian, Chinese and Indian shops, it's so much fun shopping in those :biggrin:
 
  • #78
Monique
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jimmy p said:
I dont see the deal with keeping weight down. It may just be my fantastic teenage high metabolism,
I think it is jimmyp, actually I'm sure.. together with your long days and.. :eek: not so balanced diet!! (don't forget the fruits and vegetables!)
 
  • #79
adrenaline
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Regarding bike commuting as being safe:

http://www.bicyclinginfo.org/bc/perspective.htm [Broken]


The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration uses a fatality rate per million population to state that 2.51 cyclists were killed per one million population in 2000 - the same figure for pedestrians would be 17.3 people per million and for motor vehicle fatalities the figure is closer to 127 people per million."


Wear something highly visible, get good front and rear lights at night, a mirror and helmet and you'll be fine. You're actually INCREASING your life span by getting some exercise instead of sitting in the car accumulating health problems due to inactivity.
But all these accidents resulting in death (and I like death stats instead of injury stats because the injury of death is a certain state no one can argue about, where an "injury" can be any little thing), it's not what you do, but how you do it. If you were to drive your car the wrong way up a one way street and hit another car, most would say the problem would be what you did, not that you were in a car, but if you did the same thing on a bicycle, most people would say the problem was that you were on a bike. There's discrimination in thinking towards bikes because so few ride them.

The best way to prevent any accident is to ride safely and look out for others using the road that don't. The vast majority of accidents in cycling are caused by basic rules of the road being ignored.

The public health community is now recognizing that lack of physical activity, and a decline in bicycling and walking in particular, is a major contributor to the more than 300,000 premature deaths caused by heart attacks and strokes - this number dwarfs the 40,000 annual deaths due to motor vehicle crashes and the relatively small 728 bicyclist deaths.

Unfortunately, I live in a city ranked second worst city in america to bike in (No bike lanes and rednecks run me off the road and throw beer bottles all the time) so it does take alot of effort but I think I would not be as healthy if I didn't.
 
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  • #80
jimmy p
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Monique said:
I think it is jimmyp, actually I'm sure.. together with your long days and.. :eek: not so balanced diet!! (don't forget the fruits and vegetables!)

:tongue2: But it tastes so good!!! How long does "teenage metabolism" take before it starts to slow down?
 
  • #81
Moonbear
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Monique said:
You mean, not all of the US is like that? :big relief: the only two sections you'd ever find me in was the produce and meat, well actually.. just the meat and milk/juice section.. I had to drive like 15 miles to find a store where they actually sold fresh produce, and I was living in the middle of an urban area :eek: actually, that store was on the infamous '8 mile road' in Detroit :rolleyes:

I just couldn't stomach all the other products they were selling in the aisles, and everything is soooo sweet :yuck: I actually imported all my cheese and candy and cookies and stuff :biggrin: Moonbear, if you like good cheese try to get some aged 'Old Amsterdam', it's a little pricey but oh, very yummy!! :approve:

After a while I started discovering all the Russian, Chinese and Indian shops, it's so much fun shopping in those :biggrin:
Nope, the whole US is not like that. You can breathe a sigh of relief should you decide to return. It wasn't until my last year in MI that I discovered those ethnic groceries near Detroit (they were mostly in Dearborn, weren't they?). But, that was pretty far out of my way. I did manage to live near a large farmer's market where I could get produce, but even that was something I just found by accident while driving aimlessly one day in hopes of finding something new.

Where I am now, the selection varies greatly from store to store. The two stores closest to the university campus are best, probably because they have a more ethnically diverse clientele to cater to, so there's more demand for the types of food I like. And of course it makes it easy for me to just stop and do my shopping on the way home. We have a HUGE ethnic/farmer's market type store (you can find ANYTHING there, and if you can't, you can order it) that's about 20 minutes from where I live by car, so I visit there every so often when I'm really dying for more variety. When I was in MI, it got so bad sometimes that when I visited relatives in NJ, I'd pack up my car with cases of food, or beg my sister to ship some things to me that I was just dying to have. I think the East Coast has much more of an overall European influence, at least in the Northeast, probably partly due to immigration and partly due to tourism around New York City. You don't really get many tourists in Detroit.

Adrenaline, for those biking fatalities, which category do cars running over bicyclists fall into? Do they put them under bicycle fatalities or car fatalities? That's the part I get nervous about with bicycling. I live too far from work to bike anyway, and with a VERY steep and long hill along the way that I know would kill me (and that's where I'd get run over too...the drivers on that road hardly pay attention to other cars let alone pedestrians or bikes), but I walk whenever I can.

JimmyP, I think you've got a few good years left of that metabolism :wink: but it's better to start watching what you're eating BEFORE it starts slowing down rather than noticing after you've gained the 20 lbs. :tongue2:
 
  • #82
I live in Florida, and we have no shortage of fatties here. It's not just the midwest. I'm pretty sure that the USA is the fattest country in the world, barring perhaps some small Pacific island nations.
 
  • #83
Moonbear
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Hmmm...Florida is always such a difficult state to characterize in terms of population. It seems people from everywhere else in the country move there when they retire, so you do have a large population of older people with slower metabolisms there. The younger people I've met in FL seem reasonably thin (though not necessarily physically fit).
 
  • #84
There are plenty of non-grey, highly overweight people. The percentage of people in their teens and twenties who are that big is lower than for older people, I estimate, but still way above a decent level.
 

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