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Amounts spent by PFers on dietary supplements

  1. Less than $30

    20 vote(s)
    71.4%
  2. $30-$100

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  3. $100-$300

    5 vote(s)
    17.9%
  4. $300-$1000

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. More than $1000

    3 vote(s)
    10.7%
  1. May 25, 2005 #1
    How much do PFers spend on dietary supplements? For this poll, a dietary supplement is any item specially packaged as a dietary supplement. (If you supplement your diet with, for example, green tea that is not specially packaged as a dietary supplement, please don't count that in this poll.)
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 25, 2005 #2

    chroot

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    $0. I do spend a lot on fruit and veggies, though.

    - Warren
     
  4. May 25, 2005 #3

    Mk

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    $0, I like fruits and vegy-tables too. Especially oranges and celery. And oregano.
     
  5. May 25, 2005 #4
    100-300$. I take vitamin pills because I suck at eating vegetables. I like fruits but rarely buy any besides bananas, satsumas and grapes. I also take fish oil capsules to keep my joints in check. I do bjj, judo and submission wrestling so my joints get mangled a lot. I also use recovery drinks during periods of intensive training.
     
  6. May 25, 2005 #5
    More economical to supplement with supplements than with food?

    As many persons do.
    findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m4021/is_2002_March_1/ai_85016181

    --
    Americans spend some $821 billion on food today ??? from supermarket produce to restaurant meals to snack foods at vending machines. The U.S. Department of Agriculture reports this figure will grow to $1.2 trillion over the next decade.
    --


    Assuming, since American food spending is growing 50% per decade, that the figure is going to be ~$900 billion for 2005, and assuming that there are ~290 million Americans, each individual American currently spends (or has spent on his behalf) an average of ~$3,000 per year on food. That works out to $8.22 per day.

    If Americans are spending some of that budget nutritionally supplementing with food, perhaps it would be more economical for them to be supplementing with supplements.
     
  7. May 25, 2005 #6

    Monique

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    €0, only natural foods for me. I once took vitamin supplements, but those things actually make me feel sick.
     
  8. May 25, 2005 #7

    PerennialII

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    100-300 $ .... 'amyloin', sports bars, recovery drinks .... depending on mileage & intensity, but since it's running getting the energy from 'normal' food is at times difficult.
     
  9. May 25, 2005 #8
    alot of sports drinks.

    its over 1000
     
  10. May 25, 2005 #9

    Mk

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    Gatorade's not a dietary supplement!
     
  11. May 25, 2005 #10
    who said gatorade, silly.
     
  12. May 25, 2005 #11

    brewnog

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    Where's the zero option?!

    I get all the goodness I need from a diet of OJ, spinach, Coca Cola, red meat, curry and tea!
     
  13. May 25, 2005 #12
    Did you rule out somatization disorder?
     
  14. May 25, 2005 #13

    Monique

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    You imply that my feeling of getting sick is psychological? I can rule that out; the first time I didn't know that the supplement was making me sick and I didn't even suspect it. Later I found out that the symptoms correlate with taking the supplement. I'm quite sure there is some component in there that I have a sensitivity to.
     
  15. May 25, 2005 #14
    0 - unless you include alcohol..... In which case it would be somewhat higher!!!
     
  16. May 25, 2005 #15
    Then the most that can be said is that one or more components limited to those in the supplement you took made you sick. What was the supplement that you took?
     
  17. May 25, 2005 #16

    Monique

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    Multivitamin (13) / multimineral (18), with all vitamins at 100% daily advised dose.
     
  18. May 25, 2005 #17

    Moonbear

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    Those make me sick (mildly nauseous) too. I used to take them when I was a student and didn't think dining hall food was very nutritionally complete, and it took me a long time to realize it was the vitamin making me nauseous (I attributed it to stress, the dining hall food, lack of sleep, etc., and it wasn't until I stopped feeling sick when I ran out of vitamins and didn't have time to buy more for about a week that I realized what was causing the sick feeling).

    I've read recently that some prenatal vitamins now have something added to reduce nausea because too many pregnant women were stopping taking them because the vitamins make them nauseous (though I'm not sure how they can tell it's not "morning sickness" in that case).

    So, no supplements in my diet now. If you eat a balanced diet and don't have any digestive/metabolic disorders, you don't need them.
     
  19. May 25, 2005 #18
    Supermarket supplements vs real supplements

    I meant the exact supplement, by name.

    • Components are sourced from different places and there are several different compounds that can each individually serve as a given vitamin or mineral.

    • There are components in supplements besides the listed nutrients.

    • Supermarkets and "drug stores" tend to sell extremely cheap supplements, some of which have been sitting around in storage in sub-optimal conditions for years. If you let B vitamins sit around at room temperature, they can go bad.


    Except for some fat-soluble vitamins, 100% RDA is an extremely low dose. (And maybe you meant the RDA in Holland, which might be quite different from the USRDA.) If your supplement had only 100% RDA, that tells me you probably got it from a supermarket or "drug store."
     
  20. May 25, 2005 #19

    Moonbear

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    They have expiration dates on them, so they haven't been sitting around for years if they are nowhere near the expiration date. If the vitamin is labeled for storage at room temperature, then the expiration date needs to be based on that storage temperature.

    If you're truly using it as a supplement to and not a substitute for a reasonably balanced diet, there's no need to exceed 100% RDA. Indeed, with some vitamins, you wouldn't want to exceed the RDA.

    Monique didn't say RDA, she said "daily advised dose." I don't know what that means in Holland. RDA means "recommended daily allowance."

    I'm not sure about supermarkets near you, but around here, everything on the supermarket and drug store shelves has way more than the RDA in them (around 1000% or more on some vitamins). If you just want a low dose supplement, you have to hunt all over the place to find it.

    I don't know what in a multivitamin makes me sick. I suspect it might be the zinc (I once tried one of those echinacea/zinc tablet things that are supposed to help speed up cold recovery...didn't do anything to help the cold, but did make me nauseous also). All brands I've tried have the same effect (I tried several once I realized it was a problem with the supplement, on advice that it could be an inactive ingredient in the brand I was using). Others I know have told me they've narrowed it down to the high doses of iron in them, and if they get a supplement formulated without the iron, they can tolerate them. Someone else who is lactose intolerant has trouble because they seem to contain some amount of lactose in the inactive ingredients.

    But, unless you're pregnant and need to ensure you're getting enough folic acid, there's really no need for them if you have a balanced diet.
     
  21. May 25, 2005 #20

    Monique

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    No, it's not a cheap supermarket supplement. The name is Centrum http://www.centrumvitamine.nl/, a trusted brand.

    Ingredients are the following:
    Calciumfosfaat, magnesiumoxide, microkristallijne cellulose
    (vulstof), kaliumchloride, ascorbinezuur, ijzerfumaraat, dl-alpha
    tocoferolacetaat, crospovidon (vulstof), niacine, biotine, zinkoxide,
    bètacaroteen, mangaansulfaat, pantotheenzuur, luteïne
    (E161B), stearinezuur (antiklontermiddel), magnesiumstearaat
    (bevochtigingsmiddel), siliciumdioxide (antiklontermiddel), pyridoxine,
    thiamine, ribofl avine, kopersulfaat, fytomenadion, retinolacetaat,
    kaliumjodide, chroomchloride, natriummolybdaat,
    natriumselenaat, foliumzuur, cholecalciferol, cyanocobalamine
    Tabletomhulling bestaat uit: hydroxypropylmethylcellulose
    (E464), kleurstoffen E110, E171, glyceroltriacetaat, polysorbaat 80
    (E433).

    The daily advised dose is determined nationally, defined as the minimum advised daily amount of vitamins.

    Funny that Moonbear also reports that she feels weird when taking them. I get palpitations from it and a general feeling of un-wellbeing.
     
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