An equation

  • Thread starter Lapidus
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  • #1
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Any help please why the following algebraic identity is true

[tex]\frac{k^2}{k^2-m^2} = 1 + \frac{m^2}{k^2-m^2}[/tex]

thanks
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
berkeman
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Any help please why the following algebraic identity is true

[tex]\frac{k^2}{k^2-m^2} = 1 + \frac{m^2}{k^2-m^2}[/tex]

thanks

Try putting the two terms on the RHS over a common denominator....
 
  • #3
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Of course! Thanks, Berkeman
 
  • #4
arildno
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Alternatively, use polynomial division on LHS. :smile:
 
  • #5
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Or you can multiply both LHS and RHS by (k2-m2) and cancel out the denominators. Probably the easiest way.
 
  • #6
343
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Cool. Now it is more obvios than obvious. Funny, first when I saw it, the equation looked wrong.

Anyway, does anybody know perhaps a good site where there are examples of rearranging and solving algebraic equations (and all the tricks that come along with it)? I know all the rules, but I always liked to have some more practise.
 
  • #7
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Ivans92's solution is probably the easiest one but some like the polynomial division as well and are very quick with thes solution . Just practice and youll realise what you like/can best.
 
  • #8
186
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What kind of math are you in? If you can, try getting a textbook related to the math course you have. Textbooks will always have exercises, ranging from basic to challenging.
 
  • #9
Shame on you Lapidus ! can 'nt you just do the first simple thing, sum the two and find it!
 

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