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An IQ conundrum

  1. Jul 24, 2013 #1
    Hi everyone,

    This is something that's been bothering me for a while, and I realize this isn't a self-help forum, but I was hoping I'd be able to elicit some intelligent responses on the matter. I've been a pretty great student all my life, maintaining a 3.7 GPA throughout high school, and currently maintaing a 3.8 in college. I also test fairly well on standardized tests. I received a 33 on the ACT and a 2060 on the SAT. Additionally, my friends will constantly remark how smart they think I am(I'm not tooting my own horn here, I'm just trying to make a point). Anyways, last Summer, I went to see a phycologist to be reevaluated for receiving extended time on assessments(I have Dyslexia), as I hadn't been evaluated in a while, and the college of my choice requested I do this if I wanted to get extra time. So, I took a series of tests(one of which happened to be an IQ test), had a discussion with the phycologist about the results(not specific scores but general areas of weaknesses and strengths), and then left with a humongous packet. I took the packet home with me and decided to take a closer look, just out of curiosity. Flipping through, I finally came to a page that said at the top of it "Wechsler Adult Intelligence Test." So, I thought to myself, "Wow...I had no idea they were going to test my IQ...I wonder how I did..." I Skimmed the subtests and got down to the final score: a measly 115. I was highly disappointed, to understate things. Not only that, but I scored higher on the verbal portion--VCI(122)--than on the one that's apparently related to math--PRI(113). This came as a surprise to me because I've always been MUCH better at Math than English. However, looking at the subtests for the PRI, I was able to remember the tests and the instructions I was given, some of which, suffice to say, were pretty misleading. For example, for the test where you're supposed to arrange red and white blocks into particular patterns, I was told that I had as much time as I wanted, and that I should be in no rush to finish. Though, after completing a decent amount of different patterns--I got a little bit stuck on the last one, but not completely so--the lady took away the blocks and said, "We're done with that for now." Turns out I got an 11 on that subtest, which is 1 point above average. Although, how could this be? I completed all the patterns I was asked to complete. Was this subtest time-related and I was mislead? Anyways, that was among one of the few inconsistencies I noticed; however, I'm not going to sit here and blame the psychologist for an inaccurate score, as they've probably given the same directions other test subjects with effectiveness. I may seem like an egotistical jerk for saying this, but I really think my IQ is higher than "High Average." Any suggestions for improving or ways of enlightening the situation? Please be considerate. Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 24, 2013 #2
    It's nothing to get worked up over..
     
  4. Jul 24, 2013 #3
    IQ scores are just approximations. They're good at identifying low and high intelligence (that is, they can accurately distinguish between those with disabilities and those who are gifted), but I don't think they're very good at indicating which individual out of, say, a pair of people is inherently smarter when the difference is relatively small. For example, there could be one person with a score of 120 and one with a score of 130, but, based solely on that information, it would be hard to accurately predict which individual will be more successful academically, because the difference isn't that big. I know the Feynman example has been beaten to death, but he allegedly scored around 125; good, but not fantastic. Loads of people score above that every year, but I would say very few of them are as smart as he was.

    It is important to remember that IQ tests don't measure creativity and imagination, two things that really come in handy in fields like physics.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2013
  5. Jul 24, 2013 #4

    Evo

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    So, were you denied extra time? 115 is slightly over average, and extra time does not seem justified, IMO. IQ tests don't test your overall knowledge, they were developed to test things like reasoning skills and problem solving in order to identify problems.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2013
  6. Jul 24, 2013 #5
    Really? You're going to take what little data I gave and presume that I don't need extra time? Who made you a psychologist ¬.¬? They did recommend I get extra time based on some of the other tests that I took...So, it is in fact justified...And, that's aside what I was trying to get at. What I really wanted to know is if I should take an IQ test again, know full well this time that I am taking one, or whether I should just disregard the results.
     
  7. Jul 24, 2013 #6

    micromass

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    Uuh, you come here for advice, knowing very well that we're not psychologists. We give you the advice. And you start attacking us? I guess your response wouldn't be the same if we told you that you should have been given extra time, would it :wink:
     
  8. Jul 24, 2013 #7
    There are serval things that are wrong with this. First off, you used the pronoun "us," when I haven't even said anything directly to you. Secondly, I wasn't attacking anyone, I was responding to the ignorant comment made about me not getting extra time not being justified. Thirdly, the extra time portion was just meant to give coherence to the story, not meant to be the focal point of the conversation.
     
  9. Jul 24, 2013 #8

    WannabeNewton

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    Lol this is hilarious kid, absolutely hilarious. There are better forums for you to go on pointless tirades on by the way; check out 4chan.
     
  10. Jul 24, 2013 #9

    micromass

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    You ask:

    What else could this mean than talking about your "bad" IQ test and about the time given. Additionally, you spent half your post talking about your test and getting too little time, so how were we supposed to interpret that you didn't want to talk about it?
     
  11. Jul 24, 2013 #10

    jbunniii

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    All else being equal, using paragraphs instead of a monolithic block of text makes you look smarter.
     
  12. Jul 24, 2013 #11
    Good lord, this is a train wreck.
     
  13. Jul 24, 2013 #12
    What the...? I wasn't applying for extra time on IQ tests @_@... I didn't say I got too little time, I just posed the question of whether the test was time based or not.
     
  14. Jul 24, 2013 #13

    micromass

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    Well, if that is your question, then that wasn't clear from your post at all.
     
  15. Jul 24, 2013 #14
    I was looking for honest advice, not for someone to call me a "kid" and make outlandish requests... Seriously...I got two good posts and then three jerkish ones from people who are mad at the world...
     
  16. Jul 24, 2013 #15
    That was not only question I had. More importantly, it was implied that I was distressed over the results, and was looking for advice on how to interpret the scores with a grain of salt, or alternatively whether or not it was worth retaking it with the mindset that I'd be trying my best on every question.
     
  17. Jul 24, 2013 #16
    The way you responded to evo is what provoked the type of responses you got, don't act like it was out of the blue.
     
  18. Jul 24, 2013 #17

    WannabeNewton

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    Does it though? I mean you're not a psychologist so why should I believe you?
     
  19. Jul 24, 2013 #18

    micromass

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    Well, if you're distressed over the results and if you think you can do better, then you should retake the test. Perhaps with a different psychologist too, so you get a more representative picture.

    Although the best advice we can give you is not to get worked up over IQ. It is just a meaningless number. Attaching meanings to such a number is the same thing as attaching meaning to your horoscope. It's useless, it doesn't add anything. It can only depress you.
     
  20. Jul 24, 2013 #19
    The portion about extra time not being justified wasn't warranted. I was making that clear.
     
  21. Jul 24, 2013 #20

    micromass

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    It's not what you responded to evo, it the way you responded.
     
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