Analysis of Compressive Forces in Suspension System

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The output from the load cell will be the force applied by the bottle jack minus any forces acting against it, such as friction. There is a mathematical relationship between the load cell output and the applied force, known as Hooke's Law. It states that the force applied is directly proportional to the displacement of the load cell. In summary, the conversation is about analyzing a suspension system that is braced on a metal rig and applying force to it using a bottle jack. The speaker wants to measure the vertical force input and asks if the output from the load cell will be the exact force applied. The other person explains that the forces will balance out and there is a mathematical relationship known as Hooke's Law that can be applied to calculate the force applied
  • #1
gavin1983
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I am doing some analysis on a suspension system. The suspension system is braced on a metal rig. Force is applied to it by manually pumping up a bottle jack. The ram of the jack pushes a compression plate onto the bottom of the tyre carcass.
In order to measure the vertical force input I have placed a load cell between the tyre carcass and the compression plate. Am I correct in thinking that the output from the load cell will not be the exact force I am applying with the bottle jack. Does the compression of the tyre use up some of the force exerted? Is there any mathematical relationship that can be applied to this scenario?
Any help would be greatly apreciated! :biggrin:
 
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  • #2
Nope, the forces will balance out as long as you're applying a static load.

Force will not be 'used up' by the compression of the tyre, - think of it as squashing a spring.
 
  • #3


Yes, you are correct in thinking that the output from the load cell will not be the exact force being applied by the bottle jack. This is because the compression of the tyre does use up some of the force exerted. The amount of force absorbed by the tyre will depend on various factors such as the stiffness of the tyre, the pressure inside the tyre, and the surface it is being compressed against.

To accurately measure the vertical force input, you will need to take into account the force absorbed by the tyre. This can be done by subtracting the force absorbed by the tyre from the output of the load cell. However, this may require some trial and error as the amount of force absorbed by the tyre may vary depending on the factors mentioned above.

In terms of a mathematical relationship, you can use Hooke's Law to calculate the force exerted by the bottle jack. Hooke's Law states that the force exerted by a spring is directly proportional to the displacement of the spring. In this case, the tyre can be considered as a spring that is being compressed by the bottle jack. So, by measuring the displacement of the tyre and knowing its stiffness, you can calculate the force being applied by the bottle jack.

I hope this helps! Good luck with your analysis of the suspension system.
 

Related to Analysis of Compressive Forces in Suspension System

1. What is the purpose of analyzing compressive forces in suspension systems?

The purpose of analyzing compressive forces in suspension systems is to understand how different components of the system are affected by these forces and how they contribute to the overall performance and stability of the system. This analysis helps in designing better suspension systems that can handle various types of loads and provide a smooth and comfortable ride.

2. How do compressive forces impact the performance of a suspension system?

Compressive forces can affect the performance of a suspension system in several ways. They can cause the suspension components to deform or break, leading to reduced stability and handling of the vehicle. They can also cause the suspension to bottom out, resulting in a harsh and uncomfortable ride. Additionally, compressive forces can cause the vehicle to lose traction and affect its ability to absorb shocks and vibrations from the road.

3. What factors influence the compressive forces in a suspension system?

The compressive forces in a suspension system are influenced by several factors, including the weight of the vehicle and its load, the type and condition of the suspension components, the road surface, and the speed and direction of the vehicle. Other factors such as cornering, braking, and acceleration can also impact the compressive forces in a suspension system.

4. How is the analysis of compressive forces in suspension systems conducted?

The analysis of compressive forces in suspension systems is typically conducted using computer-aided engineering (CAE) tools, such as finite element analysis (FEA) or multibody dynamics (MBD). These tools allow engineers to simulate the behavior of the suspension system under different load conditions and identify areas of high stress and potential failure. Physical testing and data collection can also be used to validate the results of the analysis.

5. What are some common methods for reducing compressive forces in suspension systems?

There are several methods for reducing compressive forces in suspension systems, including using lightweight materials, optimizing the design and geometry of suspension components, and incorporating advanced damping technologies. Additionally, proper maintenance and regular inspections can help identify and address any potential issues that may lead to high compressive forces. Ultimately, the best approach to reducing compressive forces in suspension systems depends on the specific requirements and constraints of the vehicle and its intended use.

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