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Anglo-Saxon England

  1. Sep 25, 2009 #1

    Astronuc

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    Huge hoard of Anglo-Saxon treasure uncovered in UK
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090924/ap_on_re_eu/eu_britain_anglo_saxon_gold [Broken]

    http://news.yahoo.com/nphotos/Largest-hoard-Anglo-Saxon-treasure-found/ss/events/wl/092409anglosaxon [Broken]

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/staffordshire/8272058.stm
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/8272848.stm

    Quite interesting!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 25, 2009 #2
  4. Sep 25, 2009 #3

    DavidSnider

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    Amazing that something like this sat "on top of the soil, at the grass" for 13 centuries without anybody noticing.

    Correction: Oh, nevermind, they were sitting there because of recent plowing. =)
     
  5. Sep 25, 2009 #4

    Evo

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    I can't read or hear "Mercia" without thinking of Monty Python.

    Thanks for the article Astro, the "Dark Ages", now considered the early middle ages by some, is one of my favorite eras.
     
  6. Sep 26, 2009 #5

    Astronuc

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    Yeah - I was thinking of Graham Chapman as Arthur in the "Holy Grail"

    :rofl:
     
  7. Sep 26, 2009 #6

    Integral

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    Bernard Cornwell has a very good series of books (http://www.essentially-england.com/the-anglosaxon-chronicles-by-bernard-cornwell.html" [Broken]) written around the struggles of Alfred The Great to gain and hold England. If you are interested in this era these books give a very good feeling for the life and times.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  8. Sep 26, 2009 #7

    Evo

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    I highly recommend Micheal Wood's book "In Search of the dark ages" for anyone that wants a nice summary of the Dark Ages that is understandable and highly readable by laymen. Woods writes with an enthusiasm that is contagious.
     
  9. Sep 26, 2009 #8
    Thanks for the book suggestions, I had been looking for a topic to carry me into the winter.
     
  10. Sep 27, 2009 #9

    Astronuc

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    One can find some reading material here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Declin..._fall.2C_decline.2C_transition_and_continuity

    I highly recommend Peter Heather's book, The Fall of the Roman Empire, and there are many others.

    I'm curious about the theories of Arnold J. Toynbee and James Burke. Toynbee was a prolific author and Burke has some interesting ideas expresses in his Connections programs.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_Ages
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Middle_Ages_in_history

    Bernard Lewis's The Middle East: A brief history of the last 2000 years is an interesting read in parallel with European history.

    I'll definitely have to pick up Wood's book on English history.
     
  11. Sep 30, 2009 #10
    Some years ago, I took an organized walking tour of Oxford. The tour leader, (an Oxford student from London) said the history of England began with the Conquest (1066) and generally disparaged England's Anglo-Saxon heritage. I've encountered this attitude among other English people also (mostly well educated). They seem to regard the names of the Anglo-Saxon rulers as "....rather strange and foreign sounding, wouldn't you say?" I wonder how widespread this attitude is in the UK.

    This is the cross of St George, the flag of England. St George was a Roman soldier who lived in the third and fourth century CE:
    http://blog.nawbus.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/flag-of-england.jpg

    Many English also admire the legendary King Arthur (most likely based on a Romano-Celtic warrior who fought the Anglo-Saxons) and the stone age builders of Stonehenge (often mistakenly attributed to Celtic Druids). The Celtic British Queen Boudicca of the Iceni is also highly thought of, although she suffered a terrible defeat at the hands of the Romans. About the only Anglo-Saxons that most of the English seem to respect are Alfred the Great and Beowulf.

    Perhaps this recent find will change some minds.

    http://www.britannia.com/history/stgeorge.html
    http://www.distinguishedwomen.com/biographies/boudicca.html
    http://www.britannia.com/history/h12.html
     
    Last edited: Oct 1, 2009
  12. Jul 10, 2010 #11

    Astronuc

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