1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Angular Acceleration of a rod

  1. Feb 28, 2009 #1

    TG3

    User Avatar

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    A uniform rod with of weight of 10 kg and length of 5.8 m is pivoted at its center and a small weight of mass 5.15 kg is rigidly attached to one end. You may neglect the size of the weight and assume it is located right at the end of the rod. The system is released from rest at a 37° angle. There are no external forces. What is the angular acceleration just after it is released?

    2. Relevant equations

    Torque = Angular Acceleration times Inertia
    Torque = Force times Distance from pivot
    Inertia of a uniformly weighted bar = 1/12 M L^2
    I = Icm + M D^2

    3. The attempt at a solution
    Since the bar is pivoting about it's center, the net torque of the bar itself is zero. (One side balances the other out.)
    The torque of the weight is 2.9 x 50.52 = 146.51
    146.51 = I times angular acceleration.
    The inertia of the bar = 1/12 (10) 5.8^2 = 28.033
    146.5 / 28.033 = 5.226
    This is wrong. Clearly I need to calculate the Inertia for the Weight, not just the bar, but since the problem says to neglect the size of the weight, I assume you have to treat it as part of the bar.
    How do you calculate the inertia for a non-uniform bar?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 28, 2009 #2

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    That would be true if the bar were horizontal, but it's not. Consider the angle.
     
  4. Feb 28, 2009 #3

    TG3

    User Avatar

    Ah yes. That did it. Thanks!
    I'm also having trouble with a follow up problem:

    What is the angular velocity when the rod is vertical?

    The distance the rod falls is 1.15m, since sin 37 x 2.9 = 1.745 and 2.9- 1.74 = 1.15.
    Final Velocity of an object falling in free fall is the square root of 2gy, so 9.81 x 1.15 x 2 = 4.7598
    Angular Velocity = Tangential Velocity / radius
    W = 4.7598 / 2.9
    W = 1.64, according to my (wrong) calculations.
     
  5. Feb 28, 2009 #4

    Doc Al

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    OK. The end of the rod falls that distance.
    Nothing is in free fall here. (The rod rotates about a pivot, which exerts a force on it.)

    Instead, consider conservation of energy. Find the rotational KE of the system.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Angular Acceleration of a rod
Loading...