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Angular momentum

  1. Jul 17, 2013 #1
    I just want to test my understanding of angular momentum here... I rotate a sphere in space such that the axis of rotation passes through it's diameter, by applying a torque. At one moment of time, I just stop applying the torque. Now, the net torque on the sphere is zero.There is no change in axis of rotation(Therefore the moment of inertia is constant) Thus, by the law conservation of angular momentum, the sphere rotates with a constant angular velocity.
    Is my understanding right? Please explain me if Iam wrong.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 17, 2013 #2
    That sounds completely correct to me. When there is no torque on the sphere, angular momentum is conserved.
     
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